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Maria Hupfield: Stay Golden

October 6th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Vernissage: October 10 from 3 to 5pm. The artist will be present.

Stay Golden

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to welcome Maria Hupfield for her second solo exhibition at the gallery. Based on her performance titled Jiimaan, which took place in Venice in May 2015, Stay Golden presents a new collection of gold sculptures, a life-size grey felt canoe, and a two-channel video.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield’s installations, much like her performances, employ various strategies for occupying space. The artist is interested in how the charged identity of sites can impact our behaviour, but also how they can define our identity or change our perception of things. How do we appropriate a new place for ourselves? How do we activate the places that surround us? Can these be a source of empowerment or of communion with the past?

Maria Hupfield Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015 Grelots en étain avec fini doré  et élasthanne doré avec polyfil   Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil 43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Maria Hupfield
Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015
Grelots en étain avec fini doré et élasthanne doré avec polyfil
Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil
43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Similarly, material culture and the symbolic or emotional value we imbue certain objects with, is at the core of her research. In the gallery, public memory is superimposed on the artist’s own, through objects in her Trophy Wall, an assemblage of grey felt or gold fabric sculptures; relics and artefacts of one or many previous performances. This commemorative wall suggests both a celebration and a laying to rest of these now “museum-ified” objects.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015 Installation video à deux canaux Two channel video installation  Édition : 3 1:15:00 boucle _ loop Camera Dylan McLaughlin Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015
Installation video à deux canaux
Two channel video installation
Édition : 3
1:15:00 boucle _ loop
Camera Dylan McLaughlin
Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Hupfield’s hand-made nine-foot canoe is the central element of the Jiimaan performance, which the artist enacted as part of the Ga ni tha exhibition in the Campo dei Gesuiti in Venice. An eponymous two-channel video retraces the different stages of this intervention: over three consecutive days, Hupfield performed before the public each evening, then recreated the previous night’s performance the following morning, alone and from memory.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap. 274 cm long (9’ long)

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.
274 cm long (9’ long)

This piece reveals key concepts in the artist’s work, namely proficiency, cultural memory, and the body’s presence. She proposes a meeting between nations and their history through the Canadian and Anishinaabe traditions of birch bark canoe building, paralleling this with the fabrication of gondolas by Venetian artisans. Moreover, the participatory nature of Jiimaan’s public performances makes direct reference to Anishinaabe oral traditions and Hupfield’s desire to create memories through shared human experience.

Maria Hupfield Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015 Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe. 30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield
Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015
Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds
White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe.
30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield

Maria Hupfield’s work extends through performance, installation, sculpture, video, photography, and collage. Over the past ten years, numerous institutions throughout Canada, the US, and Europe have presented her work and performances in solo and group exhibitions, namely the North American Native Museum, Zurich (2014), the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2014), the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, Washington D.C. (2013), the National Gallery of Canada (2013), the Museum of Art and Design, New York (2012), the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe (2011), and the McCord Museum, Montréal (2011). Maria Hupfield is a Canadian artist of Anishinaabe (Ojibway) heritage, and a member of the Wasauksing First Nation in Ontario. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

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