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Jonathan Plante : Trois Sculptures

January 9th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Jonathan Plante
Trois Sculptures, 2018
Exposition_Exhibition
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

 

Trois sculptures

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present Trois sculptures, an exhibition by Jonathan Plante. The exhibition reveals a series of three works from the artist’s recent production The exhibited sculptures take up the same structure, i.e. a three dimensional assemblage of eight lenticular supports. A lenticular support is an extruded plastic that functions like a series of lenses guiding the eye towards an image that will change according to the viewing angle of the viewer. Known for its commercial uses, lenticular support has been mostly used to manufacture ordinary objects. For example, a postcard that is waved backed back and forth to create the illusion of motion through two overlapping images.

By using the artisanal printing process of silkscreen to introduce an element of randomness, Plant disassociates the lenticular image from an advertising aesthetic. Through this deployment of the lenticular medium, the artist explores other modes to put the image into motion. Trois sculptures proposes an experience that shifts the opposition between activity and passivity characteristic of film. According to an approach he calls kinoplastic, it is the viewer’s movements that both freezes the image and puts it into motion. These works invite viewers to become aware of the fact that it is their movement that brings the world into appearance. A reflection that can also be traced back to the tradition of Robert Morris’s minimalist sculpture; a practice that involves both the materiality of the work and the experience of the viewer.

About Jonathan Plante

Jonathan Plante holds a MFA from Université du Québec à Montréal. His works have been presented in solo exhibitions at Galerie de l’UQAM, Galerie Division, at Musée d’art contemporain des Laurentides as well as De Ateliers in Amsterdam. He has also participated in various group exhibitions in Quebec, the US and the Netherlands. In 2017, L’œil de poisson in Quebec City showed his solo exhibition titled L’immobile. In 2013, the artist created Lapincyclope, the first of a series of exhibitions for a young viewership to be presented at VOX — Centre de l’image contemporaine in Montréal, in addition to taking part in the Quebec Triennial 2008. His works are currently part of several public and private collections among which Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal and Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. Jonathan Plante lives and works in Montréal.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot — Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images

March 10th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Lunettes superposantes, 2016 Lunettes modifiées et miroirs Modified glasses and mirror

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Lunettes superposantes, 2016
Lunettes modifiées et miroirs
Modified glasses and mirror

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present a new exhibition by Jean-Benoit Pouliot in which he adopts a conceptual and reflexive approach to the painting object. The different states of this exploration variously take shape in photography, painting and in installation or sculpture.

Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images is a project that investigates the image/object relationship through an active reflection on the contemporary conditions of the image’s appearance, transformation and distribution. Jean-Benoit Pouliot takes his own production of abstract paintings as a staring point to release the images that are inherent in them; these images will consequently be free, flexible and will continue to follow their course independently of their primary support. Does the image keep on moving beyond the point where the painting ends? If yes, in what shapes? In what spaces?

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Glissement découpé 1, 2015 Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra 36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Glissement découpé 1, 2015
Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra
Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra
36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Nowadays the image can be easily detached from its primary physical reality: it can move, appear and disappear on command depending on the digital vessel that is conveying it. Jean-Benoit Pouliot has sought to contain this new image ubiquity by personally directing several second lives of his paintings along hypothetical paths.The interventions he carries out deeply probe the physical relation that the painting intrinsically sets up between the image and the object. In the gallery space this process triggers a play of echoes between the canvasses and their photographic, textual and sculptural iterations. The paintings were digitized, stretched, cut up, photocopied, put under the microscope or described in words. This approach on several fronts enables the artist to foreground the limits and impacts of digital media in our relationship to the image. Jean-Benoit Pouliot stages his paintings and by the same token, he reframes the way in which we behold them. In reflecting the image by way of the painting, he proposes to take the time to “re-view” the painting by way of the image.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Sans-titre, 2017 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Sans-titre, 2017
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot

Jean-Benoit Pouliot (b. 1975) is a self-taught artist who began his career in the early 2000s through the medium of printmaking. Painting gained a central place in his practice in 2008, and since then, Pouliot has participated in several solo and group exhibitions in Canada and the United-States. He has also participated in Nuit Blanche Toronto (2016), the public art happening Aires libres in Montréal (2014), the Extreme Painting event in Montréal (2013 and 2010), as well as the Multi Month 10 in Québec City (2009). His works are in numerous private and institutional collections, such as the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Loto-Québec, National Bank, Bank of Montreal, TD Bank, Mouvement Desjardins, and the collection of the Cirque du Soleil, among others.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Cynthia Girard-Renard: La revanche des Sans-culottes

February 18th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

La revanche des Sans-culottes

For her first solo exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Cynthia Girard-Renard proposes a body of work created during the CALQ residency in Paris in 2015 and presented last fall in Porto, Portugal, under the title Les Sans-culottes. For the present exhibition, the series has been enlarged to include several new works, and already-existing puppets, banners and paintings have been complexified and reused. Girard-Renard’s starting point is the French Revolution, from which she develops a critical reflection on revolutionary thought in our current context of neoliberal austerity.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015 Acrylique sur toile libre de coton Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas 224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015
Acrylique sur toile libre de coton
Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas
224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

La revanche des Sans-culottes borrows its irreverent and comical energy from the caricatural social satire genre in 18th century France, an important influence for Girard-Renard during the development of the project. The title of the exhibition refers to the derogatory moniker applied to working-class protesters, that wore trousers or striped skirts, rather than the “culotte”, knickers favored by the Ancien Régime aristocracy. Girard-Renard stages confrontations between the monarchy and the people through an array of works depicting the decadence of Marie-Antoinette and Louis XVI’s court, which she compares to the voracity of today’s oligarchs and millionaires. The luxury industry, fashion, and finance collide with the threat of debt in Greece and the ubiquitous austerity that clobbers us in Québec, Europe and elsewhere – not unlike Punch’s beating-stick.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016 Techniques mixtes Mixed media 240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

In the gallery space, Le petit théâtre du grand capital (2016) depicts this confrontation between the 99% and the elusive and shapeshifting 1%. Puppets and papier mâché props adopt the burlesque and ribald codes of the Théâtre du Grand-Guignol, active in Paris from 1896 to 1963. For its part, the theatrical curtain of Sous les pavés, la plage (2015), a reference to the famous May 1968 slogan, acts as a bridge between the exhibition and 1789, invoking past revolutionary ardor and defiantly taking a stand against mediocrity’s dominion.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Les Sans-culottes, 2015 Papier, bois et corde Paper, wood and rope 167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Les Sans-culottes, 2015
Papier, bois et corde
Paper, wood and rope
167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard

For more than 20 years, Girard-Renard has been actively exhibiting in Canada and internationally, including: Esker Foundation, Calgary (2014); Thousand Plateaus Art Space, Chengdu, China (2011); Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina (2010); Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (2010); September Gallery, Berlin (2009); Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2009); SPACE, London (2006), not to mention her solo exhibition, Fictions sylvestres, at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2005) and her participation in the 2008 Quebec Triennial. Girard-Renard’s work is found in the collections of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Carleton University Art Gallery, the UQAM Gallery, as well as many private collections. The artist lives and works in Montréal.

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

David Lafrance: Summer 2014

July 17th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

David Lafrance Rebutoir 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on Canvas 122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance
Rebutoir
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

The exhibition

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau presents a solo exhibition of works by Montreal artist David Lafrance. Observational drawings from the Montérégie region are shown alongside paintings created subsequently in his studio. These cognitive representations of the countryside stem from deep introspection, and evoke the memory of place and the current dynamics that inhabit it.

The large canvases on display often suggest landscapes, and benefit from the artist’s vast visual repertoire, simultaneously encompassing folk art imagery, pastoral scenes created through the subtle layering of glazes, maps sketched in freehand, and expressive impasto techniques.

Among the depicted scenes, symbols from popular culture become cultural clues in themselves. Folk art objects or modern relics inscribed within these turbulent landscapes offer a glimpse into our industrialized society’s relationship with nature. Indeed, the troubling yet seductive environments created by the artist through the amalgamation of anachronistic objects become cathartic tools to express life’s paradoxical impulses. These dichotomies, where symbolically charged objects cohabit in natural, yet unidentifiable spaces, trigger a narrative discourse that foregrounds the complex relationship modern humans have with their environment. Nature and civilisation meet in Lafrance’s creative work, allowing us to revisit our preconceived notions of reality.

David Lafrance St-Philippe 2014 Fusain sur papier Charcoal on paper 38 x 53 cm (15” x 21”)

David Lafrance
St-Philippe
2014
Fusain sur papier
Charcoal on paper
38 x 53 cm (15” x 21”)

Artist’s statement

Painter, sculptor and sound installation artist, Lafrance creates unique works where an exalted natural world unfolds and merges with elements of human life. Through the creation of Edenic landscapes, Lafrance explores his own psyche and awakens his sensitive spirit to test the limits of expressionism. Within the artist’s practice, where basic subjectivity is laid bare, expressiveness is used to explore human cognitive reflexes and reveal specific points of view. By doing so, the artist uses art’s expressivity to confer critical value upon it. Indeed, Lafrance’s enigmatic work generally revolves around dissenting themes such as escapist pursuits, industrialization, nature, or individual and collective identity.

David Lafrance Un atelier à la campagne 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 183 x 274 cm (72” x 108”)

David Lafrance
Un atelier à la campagne
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
183 x 274 cm (72” x 108”)

David Lafrance 20 000 ans 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance
20 000 ans
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance La vie après 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 102 x 114 cm (40” x 45”)

David Lafrance
La vie après
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
102 x 114 cm (40” x 45”)

David Lafrance Usine 05 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 38 x 58 cm (15” x 23”)

David Lafrance
Usine 05
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
38 x 58 cm (15” x 23”)

David Lafrance Usine 08 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 31 x 41 cm (12” x 16”)

David Lafrance
Usine 08
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
31 x 41 cm (12” x 16”)

David-Lafrance-Ete2014-0

Lafrance-Ete2014-1

David-Lafrance-Ete2014-2

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