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David Lafrance: Jours fastes et néfastes

November 6th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening November 7 from 5 to 7 PM. Artist in attendance.

David Lafrance, Marée haute, 2018
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
182,9 x 228,6 cm (72” x 90”)

The Exhibition

 

David Lafrance’s latest paintings are an extension of his personal reflections on a landscape, and thus a society, in metamorphosis.

 

The artist delves into meteorological phenomena threatening our current era, both physically and psychically. The forecast is distressing and inescapable in Lafrance’s observations.

 

Amid representations of a nature in turbulence, each painting is punctuated by a contrasting window into an idyllic pastoral scene – postcards of an idealized past uninterrupted by climate change. Reminiscent of surrealist paintings from the 1930s, Lafrance’s aerial cognitive landscapes are populated by disembodied hands and arms, geometric and unstructured shapes and cartoonish faces that set the mood for the series. The sun is tired and wrinkled in “Un soleil de trop” (2018) and sleeping heads are metaphors for a dormant populace in “Sun Dog” (2018) and “Marée haute” (2018). Lafrance approaches the canvas with a sense of urgency, skilfully layering distinct forms of composition in a dynamic assemblage of painterly gestures.

 

 

About David Lafrance

 

David Lafrance (b. 1976) holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Concordia University in Montréal (2001) where he is currently completing his MFA. His work has been presented in numerous exhibitions and biennales in Canada, the US, and in France. Among his recent solo exhibitions are Maison de la culture Marie-Uguay (2018), Ceaac (2015), Strasbourg; Galerie Hugues Charbonneau (2014); L’Œil de Poisson (2014), Québec City; and the Musée régional de Rimouski (2012), which won the prize for “Best exhibition outside of Montréal” at the AGAC’s Gala des arts visuels. He recently participated in various group exhibitions, namely at the Musée d’art contemporain des Laurentides (2018), Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal (2015), l’Œil de Poisson (2015), Art Action Actuel, in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu (2013), and at the Centre d’art l’Écart, in Rouyn-Noranda (2013).

 

His work is part of several private and public collections, including the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (CPOA), the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec; the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montréal; Lotto Québec; Hydro-Québec; and Mouvement Desjardins.

Cindy Phenix: Ces femmes tiennent une fleur à la main

August 24th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Cindy Phenix, The Light Does Not Increase, 2018
Huile et pastel sur toile
Oil and pastel on canvas
183 x 244 cm (72″ x 96″)

The Exhibition

For her first solo exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Cindy Phenix is presenting Ces femmes tiennent une fleur à la main, a new series of paintings that are the fruit of a month-long residence at the gallery where Phenix set up her studio and initiated participation/discussion groups from which she drew inspiration.

With Ces femmes tiennent une fleur à la main, Phenix has developed a lexicon of happiness that pays heed to the complexity of the places it flourishes in and the attitudes it gives rise to. Beaches, boulevards, balconies or cabarets, these spaces where it unfolds are both public and private: there where the multitude becomes a crowd, thousands of isles of intimacy emerge. Voluptuousness, contemplation and friendship blossom there, but also along with voyeurism, vanity and envy. True to her forceful and intense aesthetic, Phenix alternates between solitary depictions and choral scenes to give life to an ode to boundless joy.

Cindy Phenix, Ces femmes qui tiennent une fleur à la main, 2018

Artist Statement

Cindy Phenix’s work focuses on the relationship between the public and private spheres. She explores the various norms that govern them, the dynamic of their coexistence, the power relations they are the site of and the emotions they trigger. To this end, the artist creates complex scenes that convey powerful narrative and affective movements.

Phenix draws her inspiration from participation/discussion groups that she organizes and leads. Through collaborative projects and shared experiences, these groups aim to raise awareness of feminine experience. At first, the women are led to interact with artworks, to take part in games and to position their bodies in installations created by the artist. They are then invited to share anecdotes and reflections as part of the discussions that Phenix guides. The bodily performances and stories shared in the process serve as fertile analysis ground for the artist who reinterprets them in her compositions.

Cindy Phenix’s paintings generate a palpable formal tension. Some surfaces are made up of gestural and abstract impastos, while others—left untouched—reveal the raw potential of the canvass. Painted zones are juxtaposed with drawn lines and take us into paradoxical spaces. Many characters, depicted in transformed complexions and bodies, interact here. The ambitious and ambiguous displays and the broad spectrum of techniques that Phenix puts to the task give rise to a dazzling emotional charge.

Karen Tam (July) and Cindy Phenix (August)

June 20th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam
Work in Progress (for Art Toronto), 2018

Cindy Phenix
Sunflowers, 2018
Huile et pastel sur toile
Oil and pastel on canvas
76 x 61 cm (30” x 24”)

Interdependence/Indispensability: Benoit Aquin, Maria Hupfield and Karen Tam

April 30th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Opening on May 2 from 5 to 7pm

Benoit Aquin
Téléphones intelligents No.22. Los Angeles (série Anton Bequii ou La dimension éthérique du réseau), 2016
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival digital pigment print
Edition 5
102 x 152 cm (40’’ x 60’’)

This group exhibition brings together Benoit Aquin, Maria Hupfield, and Karen Tam, who use different approaches in their work to negotiate power relations between the individual, artifact, place, and history. Whether through the self and its other, or through digital or physical manipulation of the art object, re-enactment is a political gesture that simultaneously allows us to experience the past and present, yet can be used to transform and distort understandings of historical events and peoples. By appropriating methods of re-enactments, the artists challenge and resist conventional production and consumption of the self and the body (Hupfield), of information and knowledge (Aquin), and of culture (Tam).

Revisiting her performative photographic series, Counterpoint, in which two figures (the self and its other) respond to one another’s presence and to the locations in which they find themselves, Hupfield disrupts the original photographs by collaging felt cutouts atop the surface, obscuring one of the models. In doing so, the artist is reasserting an individual identity and contests practices of domination and social control.

Maria Hupfield
Resistance on All Fronts, 2007-2018
Épreuve chromogène et feutre industriel
C-print and industrial felt
Edition : unique
Photo: 102 x 76 cm (40” x 30”)

The double also appears in Aquin’s project based on the life and work of photographer Anton Bequii —an alter ego whose name is an anagram of Benoit Aquin. Documenting a parallel existence and reality, Bequii’s autofictive photographs are counter-sites to the dystopic illusions and transmission of (mis)information fed to us by mass media.

A similar mimicry occurs in Tam’s papier-mâché sculptures that activate historical artifacts through their replicas, as well as in her smoke cutouts depicting woman warriors in Chinese history and folklore as door gods who ward off evil spirits and influences. Through these mirrored figures and doubled objects, Tam questions modes of cultural production and interpretation.

Karen Tam
A Double Stream of Tears, 2018
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
64 x 23 x 23 cm (25 1/4” x 9” x 9”) ch/ea

Situation #2 : Guillaume Adjutor Provost

July 7th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Les 5 et 6 juillet 2017, l’artiste Guillaume Adjutor Provost prendra le contrôle du compte Instagram de la Galerie Hugues Charbonneau où il présentera une série d’images en lien avec sa pratique artistique. Cette intervention d’une durée de 48 heures à lieu dans le cadre de notre programmation estivale « 8 artistes : 8 situations ». Toutes les publications d’Adjutor Provost seront visibles à l’aide du hashtag :

#guillaumeadjutorprovosttakeover

Au sujet de Guillaume Adjutor Provost  

À travers un certain indéterminisme des formes, la production de Guillaume Adjutor Provost sonde les manifestations de l’inconscient, la notion d’usage et la construction d’idéaux. Plus spécifiquement, il est question de la périphérie de ce qui fait histoire: la contre-culture, les archives personnelles, le vernaculaire, la science-fiction et les approches psychanalytiques.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost (n. 1987) vit et travaille à Montréal où il a complété un doctorat en étude et pratique des arts à l’UQAM en 2016. Ses recherches portent sur la notion d’art commissarial, à savoir l’utilisation d’approches commissariales comme mode de création. Le travail de Guillaume Adjutor Provost a été diffusé lors d’expositions solos et collectives au Canada, en France, en Allemagne, en Autriche, en Belgique et en Suisse. Parallèlement, sa pratique a été soulignée par l’attribution de la bourse Jean-Claude Rochefort et du prix Claudine et Stephen Bronfman en art contemporain.

Spaces for Agency — Recomposer la ville

January 12th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Isabelle Hayeur

Maria Hupfield

David Lafrance

Alain Paiement

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017 Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement Vue d'exposition Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017
Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement
Vue d’exposition
Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017 Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement Vue d'exposition Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017
Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement
Vue d’exposition
Installation view

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to launch the year 2017 with a group show bringing together Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance and Alain Paiement. Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency sets out to question notions of the “public” and “collective” in urban space. The exhibition is an invitation to reflect in a critical and different perspective on the celebrations being held as part of Montreal’s 375th anniversary.

Isabelle Hayeur Day Trading (série Nuits américaines), 2006 Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur aluminium avec traitement UV Ink jet prin on polyester mounted on aluminium with UV traitement Édition 5/5 109 x 165 cm (43

Isabelle Hayeur
Day Trading (série Nuits américaines), 2006
Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur aluminium avec traitement UV
Ink jet prin on polyester mounted on aluminium with UV traitement
Édition 5/5
109 x 165 cm (43″ x 65″)

Isabelle Hayeur, Pulse, 2015 Vidéo HD, couleur, stéréo Video, HD, color, stereo Édition 3 3 minutes

Isabelle Hayeur,
Pulse, 2015
Vidéo HD, couleur, stéréo
Video, HD, color, stereo
Édition 3
3 minutes

While not exclusive to our city, the questions we raise touch on: inhabiting city space and urban territory; established authorities; citizen resistance and engagement strategies; issues of peaceful coexistence — or its possibility in certain current political contexts. The works are presented along two mainlines in which, on one hand, the artists reimagine the topography of the city, and on the other, they explore ways of culturally and socially re-appropriating one’s environment. These mainlines which overlap in the gallery perhaps make it possible to glimpse the political potential that the works and places of art can signify in their immediate communities.

Maria Hupfield Survival and Other Acts of Defiance, 2011 Installation video et ruban adhésif en aluminium au sol en forme de

Maria Hupfield
Survival and Other Acts of Defiance, 2011
Installation video et ruban adhésif en aluminium au sol en forme de “X”
Video installation with silver “X” on floor made of aluminium tape
Édition 3
2,4 x 1,2 x 1,2 x m (8’ x 4’ x 4’)

Isabelle Hayeuris proposing two composite works. The photograph Day Trading (2006) shows the construction site of a building with an ambiguous function, which is in fact artificial because it is entirely the result of a digital manipulation. The video Pulse (2015), which is inspired by the student strike of the spring of 2015 in Montreal and the social struggles surrounding it, brings together a myriad of images found or filmed by the artist, who herewith denounces neoliberal austerity measures and erosion of political liberties. For her part, Maria Hupfield presents the video Survival and Other Acts of Defiance (2011) in which she is shown jumping on the spot, in a loop, and thus infinitely. Reinforced by the sound of tin jingles worn on her boots, she strongly affirms her presence as an indigenous woman who is constantly (re)negotiating her environment. On the floor, a large metallic X invites visitors to join in with her.

David Lafrance Place publique 1, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint 13 x 20 x 23 cm (5’’x 8’’ x 9’’)

David Lafrance
Place publique 1, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
13 x 20 x 23 cm (5’’x 8’’ x 9’’)

David Lafrance Place publique 4, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint  15 x 20 x 33 cm (6’’x 8’’ x 13’’)

David Lafrance
Place publique 4, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
15 x 20 x 33 cm (6’’x 8’’ x 13’’)

David Lafrance is presenting sculptures in multi-coloured wood that form part of the series Places publiques (2016). These imaginary city planning projects suggest a grandness and a dazzle that are paradoxically troubled by drab splashes or the affixing of disproportionate botanical sketches on their surface. Finally, Alain Paiement brings us a new large-scale photographic work,Voisinage contextuel (2016), in which he disregards the functional side of the Montreal city map and reduces the macro to the micro. He suspends the practical relationship to city space to instead recompose it in dialogue with the humans who collectively inhabit and animate it on a daily basis.

Alain Paiement Voisinage contextuel, 2016 Impression numérique sur papier coton archive Digital print on archival cotton paper Image : 142 x 213 cm (55,9” x 83,9”)  Papier_paper : 152 x 223 cm (60” x 88”)

Alain Paiement
Voisinage contextuel, 2016
Impression numérique sur papier coton archive
Digital print on archival cotton paper
Image : 142 x 213 cm (55,9” x 83,9”)
Papier_paper : 152 x 223 cm (60” x 88”)

Karen Tam: Made in Britain

December 21st, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Opening: Saturday, January 17 from 3 to 5 PM, artist in attendance

Karen Tam’s work revolves around issues relating to the representation of Asia in America and Europe through art, literature, media and consumer goods. She questions this slightly distorted Orient: an Orient tailor-made to the taste of the Western market.

Karen Tam Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box  |  Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012 Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs Papier-mâché, gesso, markers 2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Karen Tam
Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box | Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012
Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs
Papier-mâché, gesso, markers
2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Through appropriation and subversive strategies, Tam meticulously reproduces antiques, ornaments, traditional Chinese cutouts, typical interiors of Chinese restaurants and even opium dens. Yet, the artist maintains a subtle distinction between the original source of inspiration and her own interpretation from which emerges a clear critique that activates cultural and identity issues relating to racism and the globalization of trade.

Karen Tam Sinography (Gold) Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm  Total : 243 x 168 cm

Karen Tam
Sinography (Gold)
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm
Total : 243 x 168 cm

Ironically, Tam’s sculptures and installations appropriate and magnify the aesthetics of this China fantasized by and for the West, through cutouts whose traditional iconography has been subverted, antique porcelain made from papier-mâché, and decorative lanterns out of cardboard.

Karen Tam From Frog's Robe to Crow's Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers 2009 Tissu découpé (brillant) Fabric cut-out (glitter) 143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

Karen Tam
From Frog’s Robe to Crow’s Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers
2009
Tissu découpé (brillant)
Fabric cut-out (glitter)
143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

The cultural overlap that these contemporary chinoiseries reflect triggers again the history of trade routes between ‘East’ and ‘West’; it recalls the Canadian government’s exclusionary policies towards the Chinese; it deals with the imaging of cultures through contact and stereotypes; just as it updates the question of authenticity in contemporary art using a cultural studies framework.

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

The exhibition Karen Tam. Made in Britain marks the return of the artist to Montreal, where her last solo show took place in 2005. The works presented for this occasion were made during the time she lived in London while completing her doctoral studies at Goldsmiths.

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011 Fausses perles, fil à pêche Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire 161 x 161 cm (63 1/2

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011
Fausses perles, fil à pêche
Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire
161 x 161 cm (63 1/2″ x 63 1/2″)

Karen Tam lives and works in Montreal, Britain and the United States. She holds a MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a PhD from the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. Since the 2000s, her work has been featured in exhibitions in Canada, Ireland, UK, Austria, United States, and China. She has been the recipient of multiple fellowships and grants and was on the longlist for the prestigious 2010 Sobey Art Award.

Karen Tam Rex vs. Quong, 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 57 x 81 cm (22 1/2

Karen Tam
Rex vs. Quong, 2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
57 x 81 cm (22 1/2″ x 32″)

www.karentam.ca

ECHO 2: Against the Grain of History

May 24th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Benoit Aquin Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti) 2011 Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″ Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Benoit Aquin
Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti)
2011
Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″
Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Trevor Gould The Man who Walked Over the Moon 2008 Aquarelle Watercolour 41 x 31 cm (16

Trevor Gould
The Man who Walked Over the Moon
2008
Aquarelle
Watercolour
41 x 31 cm (16″ x 12,25″)

Trevor Gould Heritage, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould
Heritage, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould Echo 1, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Trevor Gould
Echo 1, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Maria Hupfield Step (Plural Positions series #14) 2014 Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Step (Plural Positions series #14)
2014
Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique
Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Seven (Plural Positions series #13) 2014 Feutre et fil de coton Felt and cotton tread 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Seven (Plural Positions series #13)
2014
Feutre et fil de coton
Felt and cotton tread
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Universal Parallels 2014 Feutre, fil à coudre Felt, sowing tread 30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”) Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield
Universal Parallels
2014
Feutre, fil à coudre
Felt, sowing tread
30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”)
Éd. unique

David Lafrance Video poker 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 203 x 183 cm (80

David Lafrance
Video poker
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
203 x 183 cm (80″ x 72″)
(Photo : Éliane Excoffier)

David Lafrance Nuit d'élections 2014 Acrylique sur papier Acrylic on paper 76 x 56 cm (30

David Lafrance
Nuit d’élections
2014
Acrylique sur papier
Acrylic on paper
76 x 56 cm (30″ x 22″)

Karen Tam I May Flirt a Little, but I'm no Yellow Peril 2009 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 90 x 40,5 cm (35,5

Karen Tam
I May Flirt a Little, but I’m no Yellow Peril
2009
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
90 x 40,5 cm (35,5″ x 16″)
Éd. 5

Karen Tam The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 13 x 68 cm (5.12

Karen Tam
The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible
2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
13 x 68 cm (5.12″ x 26.77″)
Éd. 4

Karen Tam  Do you mind if I smoke? 2008 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 30 x 30 cm (11.81

Karen Tam
Do you mind if I smoke?
2008
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
30 x 30 cm (11.81″ x 11.81″)
Éd.: 5

Karen Tam  Peeping Tom 2008 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 43 x 61 cm (24

Karen Tam
Peeping Tom
2008
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
43 x 61 cm (24″ x 16.93″)
Éd. : 5

The artist Karen Tam would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

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