Facebook
Instagram

Julie Trudel : Bone Black and Titanium White – Colour and Light

January 15th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Julie Trudel, Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane – couleur et lumière, 2019
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada (photo : Jean-Michael Seminaro)

The Exhibition

For her third solo exhibition at the gallery, Julie Trudel presents a series of new tridimensional paintings, continuing her previous exploration of color in transparency. It was during a residency in Berlin in 2015 that she first discovered a model of fluorescent plexiglas of which the borders throw light. All while keeping the constraint she imposed on herself in 2012 to paint exclusively in black and white, it’s through the support that she has reintroduced primary colours into her work.

The geometric compositions of the paintings blend matter to light to show color. Veils of translucent acrylic paint subtly change the shade of the panels and their level of transparency. Trudel attains this result by means of a rigorous artisanal method, discovered through experimental trials on plastic. The support is successively cut, polished, assembled, painted and thermoformed to create folds at precise angles. Through these interventions, Trudel is able to liberate the Plexiglas of its semiotic boundaries heavily associated with industrial plasticity, to bring it into the pictorial field. The result generates a visual complexity that reflects our era of omnipresent screens.

Julie Trudel, Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane – couleur et lumière, 2019
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada (photo : Jean-Michael Seminaro)

Artist Statement

As an abstract painter, Julie Trudel engages with the properties of paint through simple work processes that take shape through the self-imposed limitations she establishes at the start of each new project. She positions herself within the realm of reflective and conceptual painting that focuses on the making of the painting and investigates painting itself. Her research goes beyond the question of painting as coloured matter; it extends to painting as a practice and as a discipline. Her works give new currency to traditional issues of abstract painting through works that seek to renew its technical aspects – as much through its medium and its support as through its hanging. 

About Julie Trudel

She holds a BA, a BFA and an MFA from UQAM and has exhibited across Canada, Europe and the United States including recent solo exhibition at NARS Foundation, Brooklyn (2018), the group exhibition Entangled: Two Views on Contemporary Canadian Painting at the Vancouver Art Gallery (2017) and The Painting Project at Galerie de l’UQAM (2013). In addition to being awarded numerous research and creation grants as well as artist residencies across Canada and abroad, Trudel was a two-time finalist in the RBC Canadian Painting Competition (2011, 2012), and winner of the Joseph Plaskett Award in painting (2013). She is a Professor at UQAM in Montreal, where she lives and work.

The artist would like to warmly thank l’École des arts visuels et médiatiques and the Faculté des arts of UQAM, the Canada Council for the Arts and the Joseph Plaskett Foundation for the financial support of this project. She would like to highlight the precious and tireless contribution of her skilful, intelligent and reliable studio assistant Éloïse Carrier. The technical support of David Allard Martin, Mario Baillargeon, Danny Glaude, Olivier Heaps-Drolet, Ianick Raymond and Jean Talbot were also essential to realizing this body of work.

Karen Tam (July) and Cindy Phenix (August)

June 20th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam
Work in Progress (for Art Toronto), 2018

Cindy Phenix
Sunflowers, 2018
Huile et pastel sur toile
Oil and pastel on canvas
76 x 61 cm (30” x 24”)

Guillaume Adjutor Provost: Introduction

March 1st, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening on Wednesday, March 14 from 5pm to 7pm. Artist in attendance.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost
La main d’Émilie Gamelin, 2017
Impression jet d’encre sur coton
Ink jet print on cotton
208 x 200 cm (81,89” x 74,74”) | 208 x 138 cm (81,89” x 54,33”) | 208 x 128 cm (81,89” x 50,39”)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present Introduction an exhibition by Guillaume Adjutor Provost. The artist invites you to this articulation of selected works from his exhibitions Matériellement rien, potentiellement tout (Diagonale, 2017), Providence (Association des travailleurs grecs du Québec / Clark / La SERRE, 2017) and Bonne Fortune (Clark, 2016). Through a re-exhibition of his body of work, the artist proposes a discovery, with him, of the milestones of his art practice. Given that this is the first time in his career that he is represented by a gallery, he is seizing the opportunity to explore the reference points of his artistic language. It is in view of this that he chose to use the exhibition space as a post-production site.

This retrospective exhibition presents the mainlines of Guillaume Adjutor Provost’s practice: referentiality, curatorial approaches, textuality, archival and photographic languages, psychedelic manifestations. Guided by an attitude of conceptual materialism, the artist’s practice inherently reveals zones of immaterial reflections buttressed by the physical object. Through their thoughts and interactions, viewers actively contribute to defining the artist’s language. With Introduction, the encounter with iconographic works by Guillaume Adjutor thus becomes the site of a truly fertile analysis.

About Guillaume Adjutor Provost   

Lives and works in Montreal where he completed a doctorate in art and research at UQAM in 2017. Guillaume Adjutor Provost has received grants from the Conseil des Arts et des Lettres du Québec, the Canada Council for the Art, the OJIQ and the Sodec. His work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Canada, France, Germany, Belgium, Catalonia and Switzerland. In parallel, his practice has been highlighted through the Jean-Claude Rochefort award and the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art. Since autumn 2016, he has been provided with a studio at the Fonderie Darling. In 2018, he will present a solo exhibition curated by Chloé Grondeau and Marthe Carrier at the artist centre Bikini in Lyon, participate in the exhibition … Move or be Moved by Something Rather than Oneself at Critical Distance (Toronto) curated by Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau and Maude Johnson, and carry out a research residency at Fondation Rupert in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Performance via the Camera – Maria Hupfield and Lum-Desranleau

August 31st, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

As part of MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image

Group exhibition by the artists Maria Hupfield, Chloë Lum and Yannick Desranleau

Opening reception: September 9, from 3 PM to 5 PM, artists in attendance

At Galerie Hugues Charbonneau

Maria Hupfield
Waasechign, 2017
Impression numérique sur tissu
Digital print on fabric
3,05 x 5,49 mètres (10’ x 18’)

On the occasion of MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image, the new designation of Mois de la Photo à Montréal, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present the group exhibition Performance via la camera / Performance via the camera. Ami Barak, the guest curator for the 2017 biennale edition, has chosen to explore the status of the still or moving image by way of the question: What does the image stand for? According to him, the ubiquity of new media in everyday life contributes to blur the notion of photography as a witness of the real since it is now being fantasized more than ever by its author.

As a satellite MOMENTA exhibition venue, it seemed quite a propos to present the works/banners by Maria Hupfield and the duo Chloë Lum and Yannick Desranleau, because they explore questions pertaining to the processing of the contemporary image in a singular manner. More specifically, the banners resulting from their performances do not translate a documentary type photography, but rather an aesthetics developed in a premeditated day via the camera. In this case, the visual language is foregrounded both through the retouching of photos and the display of elements that trigger thought.

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau
I really I want Time for A lie – Time for
Jet d’encre sur toile, oeillets
Inkjet on canvas, grommets
Éd. 1/3 (+1 AP)
132 x 196 cm (52” x 77”)

It is in this sense that Hupfield digitally reconstructs a mirror effect within the image in which Waaschign and Portal are played out. The goal of this optical function is to highlight the idea of an intergenerational tribute inherent in the artist’s works. I really / I want / Time for / A lie, produced by Lum and Desranleau during a stay in Qatar, strategically stages portraits and manuscripts so as to bring about an effect of presence and absence recounting the essential concepts pertaining to the local pictorial traditions.

The works by Hupfield, Lum and Desranleau suggest orchestrated images that recall, in some regards, the constructed character of a commonplace publicity banner. Designed to resist changing weather conditions and to be visible from afar, the banner however relinquishes some of its original functions within an exhibition context. Those that are presented in the gallery literally overload the space and set off an immersive effect in this site.

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau
I really I want Time for A lie – I want
Jet d’encre sur toile, oeillets
Inkjet on canvas, grommets
Éd. 1/3 (+1 AP)
132 x 175 cm (52” x 69”)

mariahupfield.wordpress.com

lum-desranleau.com

Situation #6: Matthew Biederman: A Generative Adversarial Network

August 9th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening reception on August 16th from 5pm to 7pm with the artist in attendance
At Galerie Hugues Charbonneau
With the kind collaboration Art45 gallery

By modifying algorithms and training scenarios, what will the network synthesize?    


Using a state-of-the-art technique – a generative adversarial network (itself an interesting turn of phrase), a neural network has been trained to generate full body portraits that are learned from TSA three dimensional scans. The mongrel images created are not of specific persons but are ‘hallucinated’ by the network, through which the ‘learning’ process is revealed. The training dataset is from the very same scans made every time a person enters an airport terminal in the United States and several other countries. These images were released by the TSA to the public in the hope that they can develop an algorithm to automatically detect ‘threats’.  On display here is the system as it learns to create images in an awkward loop of a machine being taught to imitate the images that are gathered from the biometric data.

Matthew Biederman

About Matthew Biederman

Matthew Biederman (b. 1972, Chicago Heights, IL, USA) lives and works in Montreal. He was the recipient of the Bay Area Artist Award in Video by New Langton Arts in 1999, First Place in the Visual Arts category of Slovenia’s Break21 festival. He has since co-founded the Arctic Perspective Initiative, with Marko Peljhan, in 2007, a non-profit, international group of individuals and organizations, whose goal is to promote the creation of open authoring, communications and dissemination infrastructures for the circumpolar region.

Biederman works have been exhibited in the US, South America, Europe and Japan, in a variety of festivals and venues such as 7 ATA Festival Internacional (Lima), the 11th Lyon Bienniale, the 2011 Quebec Trienniale, 2014 Montreal Bienniale (Musee des Arts Contemporain), Bienniale of Digital Art (BIAN, Montreal), Artissima (Turin, IT) and Moscow Biennale, among others. As a film and video maker, his works have been included in the FILE festival (Sao Paulo), New Forms Festival (Vancouver), the Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Paris/Berlin International Meetings, and the Chicago Underground Film Festival. His public works have been shown at the ZeroOne2006 Festival (San Jose US), the SCAPE Biennial (New Zealand), notably.

Biederman is currently represented by Art45.

Maria Hupfield: Stay Golden

October 6th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Vernissage: October 10 from 3 to 5pm. The artist will be present.

Stay Golden

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to welcome Maria Hupfield for her second solo exhibition at the gallery. Based on her performance titled Jiimaan, which took place in Venice in May 2015, Stay Golden presents a new collection of gold sculptures, a life-size grey felt canoe, and a two-channel video.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield’s installations, much like her performances, employ various strategies for occupying space. The artist is interested in how the charged identity of sites can impact our behaviour, but also how they can define our identity or change our perception of things. How do we appropriate a new place for ourselves? How do we activate the places that surround us? Can these be a source of empowerment or of communion with the past?

Maria Hupfield Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015 Grelots en étain avec fini doré  et élasthanne doré avec polyfil   Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil 43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Maria Hupfield
Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015
Grelots en étain avec fini doré et élasthanne doré avec polyfil
Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil
43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Similarly, material culture and the symbolic or emotional value we imbue certain objects with, is at the core of her research. In the gallery, public memory is superimposed on the artist’s own, through objects in her Trophy Wall, an assemblage of grey felt or gold fabric sculptures; relics and artefacts of one or many previous performances. This commemorative wall suggests both a celebration and a laying to rest of these now “museum-ified” objects.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015 Installation video à deux canaux Two channel video installation  Édition : 3 1:15:00 boucle _ loop Camera Dylan McLaughlin Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015
Installation video à deux canaux
Two channel video installation
Édition : 3
1:15:00 boucle _ loop
Camera Dylan McLaughlin
Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Hupfield’s hand-made nine-foot canoe is the central element of the Jiimaan performance, which the artist enacted as part of the Ga ni tha exhibition in the Campo dei Gesuiti in Venice. An eponymous two-channel video retraces the different stages of this intervention: over three consecutive days, Hupfield performed before the public each evening, then recreated the previous night’s performance the following morning, alone and from memory.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap. 274 cm long (9’ long)

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.
274 cm long (9’ long)

This piece reveals key concepts in the artist’s work, namely proficiency, cultural memory, and the body’s presence. She proposes a meeting between nations and their history through the Canadian and Anishinaabe traditions of birch bark canoe building, paralleling this with the fabrication of gondolas by Venetian artisans. Moreover, the participatory nature of Jiimaan’s public performances makes direct reference to Anishinaabe oral traditions and Hupfield’s desire to create memories through shared human experience.

Maria Hupfield Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015 Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe. 30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield
Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015
Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds
White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe.
30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield

Maria Hupfield’s work extends through performance, installation, sculpture, video, photography, and collage. Over the past ten years, numerous institutions throughout Canada, the US, and Europe have presented her work and performances in solo and group exhibitions, namely the North American Native Museum, Zurich (2014), the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2014), the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, Washington D.C. (2013), the National Gallery of Canada (2013), the Museum of Art and Design, New York (2012), the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe (2011), and the McCord Museum, Montréal (2011). Maria Hupfield is a Canadian artist of Anishinaabe (Ojibway) heritage, and a member of the Wasauksing First Nation in Ontario. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Karen Tam: Made in Britain

December 21st, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Opening: Saturday, January 17 from 3 to 5 PM, artist in attendance

Karen Tam’s work revolves around issues relating to the representation of Asia in America and Europe through art, literature, media and consumer goods. She questions this slightly distorted Orient: an Orient tailor-made to the taste of the Western market.

Karen Tam Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box  |  Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012 Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs Papier-mâché, gesso, markers 2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Karen Tam
Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box | Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012
Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs
Papier-mâché, gesso, markers
2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Through appropriation and subversive strategies, Tam meticulously reproduces antiques, ornaments, traditional Chinese cutouts, typical interiors of Chinese restaurants and even opium dens. Yet, the artist maintains a subtle distinction between the original source of inspiration and her own interpretation from which emerges a clear critique that activates cultural and identity issues relating to racism and the globalization of trade.

Karen Tam Sinography (Gold) Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm  Total : 243 x 168 cm

Karen Tam
Sinography (Gold)
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm
Total : 243 x 168 cm

Ironically, Tam’s sculptures and installations appropriate and magnify the aesthetics of this China fantasized by and for the West, through cutouts whose traditional iconography has been subverted, antique porcelain made from papier-mâché, and decorative lanterns out of cardboard.

Karen Tam From Frog's Robe to Crow's Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers 2009 Tissu découpé (brillant) Fabric cut-out (glitter) 143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

Karen Tam
From Frog’s Robe to Crow’s Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers
2009
Tissu découpé (brillant)
Fabric cut-out (glitter)
143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

The cultural overlap that these contemporary chinoiseries reflect triggers again the history of trade routes between ‘East’ and ‘West’; it recalls the Canadian government’s exclusionary policies towards the Chinese; it deals with the imaging of cultures through contact and stereotypes; just as it updates the question of authenticity in contemporary art using a cultural studies framework.

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

The exhibition Karen Tam. Made in Britain marks the return of the artist to Montreal, where her last solo show took place in 2005. The works presented for this occasion were made during the time she lived in London while completing her doctoral studies at Goldsmiths.

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011 Fausses perles, fil à pêche Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire 161 x 161 cm (63 1/2

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011
Fausses perles, fil à pêche
Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire
161 x 161 cm (63 1/2″ x 63 1/2″)

Karen Tam lives and works in Montreal, Britain and the United States. She holds a MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a PhD from the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. Since the 2000s, her work has been featured in exhibitions in Canada, Ireland, UK, Austria, United States, and China. She has been the recipient of multiple fellowships and grants and was on the longlist for the prestigious 2010 Sobey Art Award.

Karen Tam Rex vs. Quong, 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 57 x 81 cm (22 1/2

Karen Tam
Rex vs. Quong, 2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
57 x 81 cm (22 1/2″ x 32″)

www.karentam.ca

Alain Paiement: Irreversibles

November 7th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d'installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d’installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

For almost thirty years, Alain Paiement has been a key figure in contemporary Canadian photography. He researches the possibilities of how photography unfolds through time and space and translates this into images. Throughout his career, he has represented the movement of the world, at a micro level, mapping architectures with aerial views, and at a macro level, in representationsof solar and lunar cycles.

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d'installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d’installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

He now turns his attention to the depths of the ocean to capture videos of the hypnotic ballet of the moon jellyfish, and pieces of ice adrift on the Saint-Lawrence River. Here, Alain Paiement reaffirms the rigorous processes that characterize his approach as he plays with the images’ construction and the viewer’s perception. He reanimates series of still photographs or multiple perspectives of the same subject, juxtaposing these representations, but also altering their symmetry, synchrony, movement, and symbolism.

The manipulated images emerge from black backgrounds. It is difficult to determine whether they are photographs or moving images. They are blurring our perception of time, which seems distended and unstructured.

This important solo exhibition by Alain Paiement will be presented in two parts. The second instalment will take place in 2015.

The artist would like to thank Guilhem Molinier and the Fond de recherche du Québec – Société et culture.

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d'installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d’installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement’s work has been presented in numerous exhibitions since the 1980s throughout Canada and the United States, but also in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. He has received several prizes in contemporary photography, and has produced many public artworks in Québec, namely for the new CHUM in Montréal (2013). His work is included in major institutional and private collections in Canada, the US, Spain, and Belgium.

Alain Paiement Start, End, Here 2012 Épreuve numérique à pigments qualité archive Archival digital pigment print

Alain Paiement
Start, End, Here
2012
Épreuve numérique à pigments qualité archive
Archival digital pigment print

ECHO 2: Against the Grain of History

May 24th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Benoit Aquin Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti) 2011 Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″ Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Benoit Aquin
Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti)
2011
Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″
Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Trevor Gould The Man who Walked Over the Moon 2008 Aquarelle Watercolour 41 x 31 cm (16

Trevor Gould
The Man who Walked Over the Moon
2008
Aquarelle
Watercolour
41 x 31 cm (16″ x 12,25″)

Trevor Gould Heritage, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould
Heritage, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould Echo 1, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Trevor Gould
Echo 1, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Maria Hupfield Step (Plural Positions series #14) 2014 Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Step (Plural Positions series #14)
2014
Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique
Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Seven (Plural Positions series #13) 2014 Feutre et fil de coton Felt and cotton tread 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Seven (Plural Positions series #13)
2014
Feutre et fil de coton
Felt and cotton tread
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Universal Parallels 2014 Feutre, fil à coudre Felt, sowing tread 30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”) Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield
Universal Parallels
2014
Feutre, fil à coudre
Felt, sowing tread
30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”)
Éd. unique

David Lafrance Video poker 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 203 x 183 cm (80

David Lafrance
Video poker
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
203 x 183 cm (80″ x 72″)
(Photo : Éliane Excoffier)

David Lafrance Nuit d'élections 2014 Acrylique sur papier Acrylic on paper 76 x 56 cm (30

David Lafrance
Nuit d’élections
2014
Acrylique sur papier
Acrylic on paper
76 x 56 cm (30″ x 22″)

Karen Tam I May Flirt a Little, but I'm no Yellow Peril 2009 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 90 x 40,5 cm (35,5

Karen Tam
I May Flirt a Little, but I’m no Yellow Peril
2009
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
90 x 40,5 cm (35,5″ x 16″)
Éd. 5

Karen Tam The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 13 x 68 cm (5.12

Karen Tam
The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible
2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
13 x 68 cm (5.12″ x 26.77″)
Éd. 4

Karen Tam  Do you mind if I smoke? 2008 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 30 x 30 cm (11.81

Karen Tam
Do you mind if I smoke?
2008
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
30 x 30 cm (11.81″ x 11.81″)
Éd.: 5

Karen Tam  Peeping Tom 2008 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 43 x 61 cm (24

Karen Tam
Peeping Tom
2008
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
43 x 61 cm (24″ x 16.93″)
Éd. : 5

The artist Karen Tam would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

CCFA_RGB_colour_f

Marie-Claude Bouthillier : Mégalithes

May 25th, 2013 § Comments Off on Marie-Claude Bouthillier : Mégalithes § permalink

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 06, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 06, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59″ x 47″, 150 x 120 cm

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Astrolithe, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylique on canvas, 20 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Astrolithe, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylique on canvas, 20 1/2″ x 14 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 05, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 05, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59″ x 47″, 150 x 120 cm

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes (nébuleuse), Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 33 (étoile), 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 12

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 33 (étoile), 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 12″ x 11″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 11, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 24

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 11, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 24″ x 24″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe (pierre blanche), 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 15 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe (pierre blanche), 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 15 1/2″ x 11 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 21, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 21, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2″ x 16 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 23, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 23, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2″ x 16 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 25, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 25, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2″ x 16 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 02, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 82.5

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 02, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 82.5″ x 59″, 210 x 150 cm

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, MM et Mégalithe, 2001-2013, encaustique, carbone, acrylique et huile sur papier, encaustic, carbon, acrilic and oil on paper, 15 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, MM et Mégalithe, 2001-2013, encaustique, carbone, acrylique et huile sur papier, encaustic, carbon, acrilic and oil on paper, 15 1/2″ x 10 3/4″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 36, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 36, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36″ x 36″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 37, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 37, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36″ x 36″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 38, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 38, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36″ x 36″

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing entries tagged with Installation at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau.