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Interdependence/Indispensability: Benoit Aquin, Maria Hupfield and Karen Tam

April 30th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Opening on May 2 from 5 to 7pm

Benoit Aquin
Téléphones intelligents No.22. Los Angeles (série Anton Bequii ou La dimension éthérique du réseau), 2016
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival digital pigment print
Edition 5
102 x 152 cm (40’’ x 60’’)

This group exhibition brings together Benoit Aquin, Maria Hupfield, and Karen Tam, who use different approaches in their work to negotiate power relations between the individual, artifact, place, and history. Whether through the self and its other, or through digital or physical manipulation of the art object, re-enactment is a political gesture that simultaneously allows us to experience the past and present, yet can be used to transform and distort understandings of historical events and peoples. By appropriating methods of re-enactments, the artists challenge and resist conventional production and consumption of the self and the body (Hupfield), of information and knowledge (Aquin), and of culture (Tam).

Revisiting her performative photographic series, Counterpoint, in which two figures (the self and its other) respond to one another’s presence and to the locations in which they find themselves, Hupfield disrupts the original photographs by collaging felt cutouts atop the surface, obscuring one of the models. In doing so, the artist is reasserting an individual identity and contests practices of domination and social control.

Maria Hupfield
Resistance on All Fronts, 2007-2018
Épreuve chromogène et feutre industriel
C-print and industrial felt
Edition : unique
Photo: 102 x 76 cm (40” x 30”)

The double also appears in Aquin’s project based on the life and work of photographer Anton Bequii —an alter ego whose name is an anagram of Benoit Aquin. Documenting a parallel existence and reality, Bequii’s autofictive photographs are counter-sites to the dystopic illusions and transmission of (mis)information fed to us by mass media.

A similar mimicry occurs in Tam’s papier-mâché sculptures that activate historical artifacts through their replicas, as well as in her smoke cutouts depicting woman warriors in Chinese history and folklore as door gods who ward off evil spirits and influences. Through these mirrored figures and doubled objects, Tam questions modes of cultural production and interpretation.

Karen Tam
A Double Stream of Tears, 2018
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
64 x 23 x 23 cm (25 1/4” x 9” x 9”) ch/ea

Performance via the Camera – Maria Hupfield and Lum-Desranleau

August 31st, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

As part of MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image

Group exhibition by the artists Maria Hupfield, Chloë Lum and Yannick Desranleau

Opening reception: September 9, from 3 PM to 5 PM, artists in attendance

At Galerie Hugues Charbonneau

Maria Hupfield
Waasechign, 2017
Impression numérique sur tissu
Digital print on fabric
3,05 x 5,49 mètres (10’ x 18’)

On the occasion of MOMENTA | Biennale de l’image, the new designation of Mois de la Photo à Montréal, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present the group exhibition Performance via la camera / Performance via the camera. Ami Barak, the guest curator for the 2017 biennale edition, has chosen to explore the status of the still or moving image by way of the question: What does the image stand for? According to him, the ubiquity of new media in everyday life contributes to blur the notion of photography as a witness of the real since it is now being fantasized more than ever by its author.

As a satellite MOMENTA exhibition venue, it seemed quite a propos to present the works/banners by Maria Hupfield and the duo Chloë Lum and Yannick Desranleau, because they explore questions pertaining to the processing of the contemporary image in a singular manner. More specifically, the banners resulting from their performances do not translate a documentary type photography, but rather an aesthetics developed in a premeditated day via the camera. In this case, the visual language is foregrounded both through the retouching of photos and the display of elements that trigger thought.

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau
I really I want Time for A lie – Time for
Jet d’encre sur toile, oeillets
Inkjet on canvas, grommets
Éd. 1/3 (+1 AP)
132 x 196 cm (52” x 77”)

It is in this sense that Hupfield digitally reconstructs a mirror effect within the image in which Waaschign and Portal are played out. The goal of this optical function is to highlight the idea of an intergenerational tribute inherent in the artist’s works. I really / I want / Time for / A lie, produced by Lum and Desranleau during a stay in Qatar, strategically stages portraits and manuscripts so as to bring about an effect of presence and absence recounting the essential concepts pertaining to the local pictorial traditions.

The works by Hupfield, Lum and Desranleau suggest orchestrated images that recall, in some regards, the constructed character of a commonplace publicity banner. Designed to resist changing weather conditions and to be visible from afar, the banner however relinquishes some of its original functions within an exhibition context. Those that are presented in the gallery literally overload the space and set off an immersive effect in this site.

Chloë Lum & Yannick Desranleau
I really I want Time for A lie – I want
Jet d’encre sur toile, oeillets
Inkjet on canvas, grommets
Éd. 1/3 (+1 AP)
132 x 175 cm (52” x 69”)

mariahupfield.wordpress.com

lum-desranleau.com

Situation #4: Maria Hupfield : KA-POW!

July 18th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Public artwork KA-POW! on view at Victoria Square

As part of the Montreal 375th anniversary donation project “Promenade Fleuve-Montagne” #PromenadeFM.

Maria Hupfield
KA-POW!, 2017
Sculpture publique
Public sculpture
(Photo: Sébastien Roy, DHC\ART)

KA-POW!

 

The word KA-POW! speaks the language of action, force, movement, breath and sound. KA-POW! is comprised of two seated bench areas fixed amongst a grove of trees at Victoria Square park. Referencing lightening bolts, geometric star blanket patterns and cartoon action text bubbles the benches are a radical act of unity to bring more integration between public spaces and the more than human natural world. The geometric forms are anchored in many levels of meaning at ground level, supporting the public under a canopy of leaves. For this site specific commission Brooklyn based performance artist Maria Hupfield centers trees as dynamic living forces in an effort to bring people together with our relations a busy intersection. KA-POW! is part of le Sentier de résilience curated by Cheryl Sim in collaboration with Phi Centre and DHC/ART. It is located at the heart of la Promenade Fleuve-Montagne.

Maria Hupfield
KA-POW!, 2017
Sculpture publique
Public sculpture
(Photo: Sébastien Roy, DHC\ART)

Maria Hupfield
Hupfield activates her creations in live performance. She is interested in shared moments that open spaces for possibility and new narratives. She is deeply invested in intersectionality, indigenous feminisms, race, gender, and class. Hupfield is a member of the Anishinaabe Nation at Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario. Her recent traveling solo exhibition, The One Who Keeps On Giving, opened the thirtieth anniversary of the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto. Hupfield is an alumna of the AIM program at the Bronx Museum and a Joan Mitchell Foundation recipient. Exhibitions include shows at the SITE Santa Fe Biennial, James Gallery, the BRIC Biennial, the Bronx Museum, Vox Populi, and Panoply Performance Laboratory. Hupfield was also a part of the group exhibition Beat Nation. Art, Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture (2012-2014) presented at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery and the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal.

 

Spaces for Agency — Recomposer la ville

January 12th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Isabelle Hayeur

Maria Hupfield

David Lafrance

Alain Paiement

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017 Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement Vue d'exposition Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017
Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement
Vue d’exposition
Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017 Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement Vue d'exposition Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017
Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement
Vue d’exposition
Installation view

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to launch the year 2017 with a group show bringing together Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance and Alain Paiement. Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency sets out to question notions of the “public” and “collective” in urban space. The exhibition is an invitation to reflect in a critical and different perspective on the celebrations being held as part of Montreal’s 375th anniversary.

Isabelle Hayeur Day Trading (série Nuits américaines), 2006 Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur aluminium avec traitement UV Ink jet prin on polyester mounted on aluminium with UV traitement Édition 5/5 109 x 165 cm (43

Isabelle Hayeur
Day Trading (série Nuits américaines), 2006
Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur aluminium avec traitement UV
Ink jet prin on polyester mounted on aluminium with UV traitement
Édition 5/5
109 x 165 cm (43″ x 65″)

Isabelle Hayeur, Pulse, 2015 Vidéo HD, couleur, stéréo Video, HD, color, stereo Édition 3 3 minutes

Isabelle Hayeur,
Pulse, 2015
Vidéo HD, couleur, stéréo
Video, HD, color, stereo
Édition 3
3 minutes

While not exclusive to our city, the questions we raise touch on: inhabiting city space and urban territory; established authorities; citizen resistance and engagement strategies; issues of peaceful coexistence — or its possibility in certain current political contexts. The works are presented along two mainlines in which, on one hand, the artists reimagine the topography of the city, and on the other, they explore ways of culturally and socially re-appropriating one’s environment. These mainlines which overlap in the gallery perhaps make it possible to glimpse the political potential that the works and places of art can signify in their immediate communities.

Maria Hupfield Survival and Other Acts of Defiance, 2011 Installation video et ruban adhésif en aluminium au sol en forme de

Maria Hupfield
Survival and Other Acts of Defiance, 2011
Installation video et ruban adhésif en aluminium au sol en forme de “X”
Video installation with silver “X” on floor made of aluminium tape
Édition 3
2,4 x 1,2 x 1,2 x m (8’ x 4’ x 4’)

Isabelle Hayeuris proposing two composite works. The photograph Day Trading (2006) shows the construction site of a building with an ambiguous function, which is in fact artificial because it is entirely the result of a digital manipulation. The video Pulse (2015), which is inspired by the student strike of the spring of 2015 in Montreal and the social struggles surrounding it, brings together a myriad of images found or filmed by the artist, who herewith denounces neoliberal austerity measures and erosion of political liberties. For her part, Maria Hupfield presents the video Survival and Other Acts of Defiance (2011) in which she is shown jumping on the spot, in a loop, and thus infinitely. Reinforced by the sound of tin jingles worn on her boots, she strongly affirms her presence as an indigenous woman who is constantly (re)negotiating her environment. On the floor, a large metallic X invites visitors to join in with her.

David Lafrance Place publique 1, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint 13 x 20 x 23 cm (5’’x 8’’ x 9’’)

David Lafrance
Place publique 1, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
13 x 20 x 23 cm (5’’x 8’’ x 9’’)

David Lafrance Place publique 4, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint  15 x 20 x 33 cm (6’’x 8’’ x 13’’)

David Lafrance
Place publique 4, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
15 x 20 x 33 cm (6’’x 8’’ x 13’’)

David Lafrance is presenting sculptures in multi-coloured wood that form part of the series Places publiques (2016). These imaginary city planning projects suggest a grandness and a dazzle that are paradoxically troubled by drab splashes or the affixing of disproportionate botanical sketches on their surface. Finally, Alain Paiement brings us a new large-scale photographic work,Voisinage contextuel (2016), in which he disregards the functional side of the Montreal city map and reduces the macro to the micro. He suspends the practical relationship to city space to instead recompose it in dialogue with the humans who collectively inhabit and animate it on a daily basis.

Alain Paiement Voisinage contextuel, 2016 Impression numérique sur papier coton archive Digital print on archival cotton paper Image : 142 x 213 cm (55,9” x 83,9”)  Papier_paper : 152 x 223 cm (60” x 88”)

Alain Paiement
Voisinage contextuel, 2016
Impression numérique sur papier coton archive
Digital print on archival cotton paper
Image : 142 x 213 cm (55,9” x 83,9”)
Papier_paper : 152 x 223 cm (60” x 88”)

Maria Hupfield: Stay Golden

October 6th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Vernissage: October 10 from 3 to 5pm. The artist will be present.

Stay Golden

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to welcome Maria Hupfield for her second solo exhibition at the gallery. Based on her performance titled Jiimaan, which took place in Venice in May 2015, Stay Golden presents a new collection of gold sculptures, a life-size grey felt canoe, and a two-channel video.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield’s installations, much like her performances, employ various strategies for occupying space. The artist is interested in how the charged identity of sites can impact our behaviour, but also how they can define our identity or change our perception of things. How do we appropriate a new place for ourselves? How do we activate the places that surround us? Can these be a source of empowerment or of communion with the past?

Maria Hupfield Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015 Grelots en étain avec fini doré  et élasthanne doré avec polyfil   Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil 43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Maria Hupfield
Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015
Grelots en étain avec fini doré et élasthanne doré avec polyfil
Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil
43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Similarly, material culture and the symbolic or emotional value we imbue certain objects with, is at the core of her research. In the gallery, public memory is superimposed on the artist’s own, through objects in her Trophy Wall, an assemblage of grey felt or gold fabric sculptures; relics and artefacts of one or many previous performances. This commemorative wall suggests both a celebration and a laying to rest of these now “museum-ified” objects.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015 Installation video à deux canaux Two channel video installation  Édition : 3 1:15:00 boucle _ loop Camera Dylan McLaughlin Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015
Installation video à deux canaux
Two channel video installation
Édition : 3
1:15:00 boucle _ loop
Camera Dylan McLaughlin
Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Hupfield’s hand-made nine-foot canoe is the central element of the Jiimaan performance, which the artist enacted as part of the Ga ni tha exhibition in the Campo dei Gesuiti in Venice. An eponymous two-channel video retraces the different stages of this intervention: over three consecutive days, Hupfield performed before the public each evening, then recreated the previous night’s performance the following morning, alone and from memory.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap. 274 cm long (9’ long)

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.
274 cm long (9’ long)

This piece reveals key concepts in the artist’s work, namely proficiency, cultural memory, and the body’s presence. She proposes a meeting between nations and their history through the Canadian and Anishinaabe traditions of birch bark canoe building, paralleling this with the fabrication of gondolas by Venetian artisans. Moreover, the participatory nature of Jiimaan’s public performances makes direct reference to Anishinaabe oral traditions and Hupfield’s desire to create memories through shared human experience.

Maria Hupfield Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015 Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe. 30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield
Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015
Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds
White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe.
30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield

Maria Hupfield’s work extends through performance, installation, sculpture, video, photography, and collage. Over the past ten years, numerous institutions throughout Canada, the US, and Europe have presented her work and performances in solo and group exhibitions, namely the North American Native Museum, Zurich (2014), the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2014), the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, Washington D.C. (2013), the National Gallery of Canada (2013), the Museum of Art and Design, New York (2012), the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe (2011), and the McCord Museum, Montréal (2011). Maria Hupfield is a Canadian artist of Anishinaabe (Ojibway) heritage, and a member of the Wasauksing First Nation in Ontario. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

ECHO 2: Against the Grain of History

May 24th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Benoit Aquin Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti) 2011 Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″ Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Benoit Aquin
Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti)
2011
Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″
Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Trevor Gould The Man who Walked Over the Moon 2008 Aquarelle Watercolour 41 x 31 cm (16

Trevor Gould
The Man who Walked Over the Moon
2008
Aquarelle
Watercolour
41 x 31 cm (16″ x 12,25″)

Trevor Gould Heritage, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould
Heritage, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould Echo 1, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Trevor Gould
Echo 1, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Maria Hupfield Step (Plural Positions series #14) 2014 Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Step (Plural Positions series #14)
2014
Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique
Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Seven (Plural Positions series #13) 2014 Feutre et fil de coton Felt and cotton tread 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Seven (Plural Positions series #13)
2014
Feutre et fil de coton
Felt and cotton tread
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Universal Parallels 2014 Feutre, fil à coudre Felt, sowing tread 30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”) Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield
Universal Parallels
2014
Feutre, fil à coudre
Felt, sowing tread
30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”)
Éd. unique

David Lafrance Video poker 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 203 x 183 cm (80

David Lafrance
Video poker
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
203 x 183 cm (80″ x 72″)
(Photo : Éliane Excoffier)

David Lafrance Nuit d'élections 2014 Acrylique sur papier Acrylic on paper 76 x 56 cm (30

David Lafrance
Nuit d’élections
2014
Acrylique sur papier
Acrylic on paper
76 x 56 cm (30″ x 22″)

Karen Tam I May Flirt a Little, but I'm no Yellow Peril 2009 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 90 x 40,5 cm (35,5

Karen Tam
I May Flirt a Little, but I’m no Yellow Peril
2009
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
90 x 40,5 cm (35,5″ x 16″)
Éd. 5

Karen Tam The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 13 x 68 cm (5.12

Karen Tam
The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible
2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
13 x 68 cm (5.12″ x 26.77″)
Éd. 4

Karen Tam  Do you mind if I smoke? 2008 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 30 x 30 cm (11.81

Karen Tam
Do you mind if I smoke?
2008
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
30 x 30 cm (11.81″ x 11.81″)
Éd.: 5

Karen Tam  Peeping Tom 2008 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 43 x 61 cm (24

Karen Tam
Peeping Tom
2008
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
43 x 61 cm (24″ x 16.93″)
Éd. : 5

The artist Karen Tam would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

CCFA_RGB_colour_f

Maria Hupfield : Performance : Lab

October 17th, 2013 § 0 comments § permalink

Performances each evening at 7 p.m.

Maria Hupfield, Yes, Yes Yes Yes No No No, 2013

Maria Hupfield, Yes, Yes Yes Yes No No No, 2013

Maria Hupfield, Snowsuit, 2012

Maria Hupfield, Snowsuit, 2012

For her first project at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Brooklyn-based, Canadian artist Maria Hupfield has invited local artists to collaborate in evening performances open to the public. As anchor and starting part for the project, Hupfield sees this gesture as an introduction to a significant part of her practice, and a way to establish links within the Montreal community.

Hupfield’s own performance practice has developed around activating spaces in ways that reference Anishnaabe oral tradition and feminist performance history, as well as the work of Jimmie Durham and Joseph Beuys. It is also characterized by the creation of a detailed series of sculpture-accessories—often worn or carried on the body—which she deploys in performances.

A selection of these objects will be installed in the gallery by curator Rhonda Meier, in addition to residual elements from the evening performances. The gallery will be open to the public from 12 to 5 p.m.

Collaborative performances with Montreal guests, Scott Benesiinaabandan, Emma-Kate Guimond, Emilie Monnet, and karen elaine spencer will be workshopped in the gallery each day, and begin every evening at 7 pm. (free and open to the public).

 

Artist Biographies

Based in Brooklyn, Maria Hupfield is of Canadian Anishnaabe (Ojibway) heritage and a member of Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario.  An MFA graduate of York University, she earned a BA in Art and Art History from the University of Toronto.  Maria was selected for the 2013 winter studio residency, Wave Hill NY, and the 2012 Artist Leadership Program, Smithsonian Washington DC.  She has shown at the Museum of Arts and Design New York, The Vancouver Art Gallery, Toronto Power Plant, 7a*11d International Performance Festival; her work is also in the current traveling exhibition Beat Nation.   Her performance ‘An Artist Tour Guide’ is commissioned by the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian NY in response to the exhibition Before and After the Horizon:  Anishnaabe Artists of the Great Lakes, to travel to the AGO.  She has recently been shortlisted for the Joan Mitchell award.
Scott Benesiinaabandan is an Anishinaabe artist working primarily in photography, printmaking and video. He has been awarded international residencies in Australia, Northern Ireland, and has worked with Obx Lab for experimental media at Concordia University/Hexagram. http://benesiinaabandan.com/

With a BFA in contemporary dance, Emma-Kate Guimond’s work melds drawing, video, text and performance. Her performance installations have been exhibited throughout Montreal, and recently as part of Toronto’s NXNE Art, and Edmonton’s Visualeyez Festival. www.emmakateguimond.wordpress.com

Interdisciplinary artist Emilie Monnet is an award-winning actress, director, singer, performance and media artist whose work is grounded in years of social activism. In 2011, she founded Onishka productions to promote performance work, encourage both local and international collaborations, and continue to write and tell stories, both personal and collective. www.onishka.org

karen elaine spencer’s work oscillates between studio practice, work in the street, curation, and web disseminations. In 2012, she received La Centrale’s prix powerhouse, recognizing her significant, sustained contribution to Montreal’s cultural milieu. She has exhibited across Canada, the U.S., and in Europe. http://likewritingwithwater.wordpress.com/

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