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Trevor Gould, Moridja Kitenge Banza and Cindy Phenix in residency

June 18th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Trevor Gould, Live in a Box: A Refuge, 2017
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
75,5 x 68,5 x 50,5 cm (29 3/4” x 27” x 20”)

Moridja Kitenge Banza, Chiromancie #9 No 11, 2019
Encre sur mylar
Ink on mylar
107 x 244 cm (42” x 96”)

Cindy Phenix, The End That Is Not, 2019
Pastel, huile, acrylique et tissus sur lin
Oil, acrylic pastel and found fabric on linen
121,9 x 91,4 cm (48” x 36”)

Moridja Kitenge Banza:1

February 27th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Moridja Kitenge Banza, Christ Pantocrator No1, 2017
Acrylique sur bois, feuille d’or
Acrylic on panel, gold leaf
40 x 30 cm (15,75” x 11,75”)

 

For his first exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Moridja Kitenge Banza is presenting  a painting from his series “Christ Pantocrator” which explores the complexity of his Congolese cultural identity through deeply rooted colonial symbols that he subjects to shifts in meaning. The artist describes this series in the following text.

 

A Christ Pantocrator is a Byzantine icon of Christ represented as almighty in his glorious body. This painting series borrows this representation as a starting point to question my relationship to masks from Africa found in Western art museums.

In most African cultures, masks are meant to be used in sacred rites and ceremonies celebrating birth, death or harvest. When dispalced as static objects in museums, they become amputated from their contexts of origin, simultaneously revealing aporias : the aritsts’ identities are unknown and their provenance, undisclosed to the people and places they come from. Silent and detached from contemporary African life, these masks are nonetheless a material testament of the diversity and complexity of these societies. They are essential vehicules of customs and heritage for future generations of africans.

My reflexions are guided by a critical analysis of historical and cultural aspects of my country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as my own history, combining multiple layers of narratives and meanings. Catholicism plays an important role, passed on to my ancesters by Jesuit priests during the evangelization of the Congo, and carried through my ancestry, as well as my own family’s experiences. My current outlook on these persistant symbols is energized by an intersecting creative intent, between memory and reappropriation.

To this end, I draw from various museum collections that possess African masks. I reproduce Pantocrator paintings, over which I paint the masks I have chosen, covering the face of Christ. Through this intervention, I return its glory to the sacred object and reactivate its function: that of being worn.

 

Moridja Kitenge Banza : 1 (exposition_exhibition), 2019, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada (photo : Jean-Michael Seminaro)

 

 

Biography

Canadian Congolese aritst Moridja Kitenge Banza was born in Kinshasa in 1980 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He holds degrees from l’Académie des beaux-arts de Kinshasa, from l’École supérieure des beaux-arts de Nantes Métropole and from the Humanities and Social Sciences faculty of l’Université de La Rochelle.  In 2010, he was awarded the first prize of the Biennale of Contemporary African Art, DAK’ART for his video Hymne à nousand his installation work De 1848 à nos jours. His work was part of exhibitions at the Musée Dauphinois (Grenoble, France), at the Museum of Contemporary Art (Rosklide, Danemark), at the Arndt Gallery and Ngbk (Berlin, Allemagne), at the Biennale Internationale de Casablanca (Casablanca, Maroc), at the Fondation Attijariwafa bank (Casablanca, Maroc), at the Fondation Blachère (Apt, France) as well as at the BAnQ, at galerie Joyce Yahouda, at Oboro and at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal (Montréal, Canada).

 

Artist Statement

As a multidisciplinary artist, I express myself through painting, photography, video, drawing and installation.

My process is situated at the intersection of reality and fiction. Through this lens, I question the history, memory and identity of the places where I live or have lived in relation to the place I occupy in these localities. I intentionally confuse fact and fiction to problematize hegemonic narratives and create spaces where marginalized discourse could flourish. Drawing from past and present situations, I organize, assemble and trace figures, as would a land surveyor, by reappropriating the codes of cultural, political, social and economic representations. In so doing, I build my own tools to better invest the “other’s” territory in order to enrich all the fields of research that inspire my practice.

 

The gallery would like to extend its gratitude to Anne-Isabelle Pronkina for her contribution to the development of the exhibition’s concept.

 

Moridja Kitenge Banza, Authentique #1, 2017
Impression archive au jet d’encre sur papier
Archival digital inkjet print on paper
Édition 3/5
86,3 x 61 cm (34” x 24”)

Julie Trudel in artistic residency at the gallery

December 28th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Julie Trudel will further explore the project exhibited last fall at the NARS Foundation in Brooklyn. Opening January 16.

David Lafrance: Jours fastes et néfastes

November 6th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening November 7 from 5 to 7 PM. Artist in attendance.

David Lafrance, Marée haute, 2018
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
182,9 x 228,6 cm (72” x 90”)

The Exhibition

 

David Lafrance’s latest paintings are an extension of his personal reflections on a landscape, and thus a society, in metamorphosis.

 

The artist delves into meteorological phenomena threatening our current era, both physically and psychically. The forecast is distressing and inescapable in Lafrance’s observations.

 

Amid representations of a nature in turbulence, each painting is punctuated by a contrasting window into an idyllic pastoral scene – postcards of an idealized past uninterrupted by climate change. Reminiscent of surrealist paintings from the 1930s, Lafrance’s aerial cognitive landscapes are populated by disembodied hands and arms, geometric and unstructured shapes and cartoonish faces that set the mood for the series. The sun is tired and wrinkled in “Un soleil de trop” (2018) and sleeping heads are metaphors for a dormant populace in “Sun Dog” (2018) and “Marée haute” (2018). Lafrance approaches the canvas with a sense of urgency, skilfully layering distinct forms of composition in a dynamic assemblage of painterly gestures.

 

 

About David Lafrance

 

David Lafrance (b. 1976) holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Concordia University in Montréal (2001) where he is currently completing his MFA. His work has been presented in numerous exhibitions and biennales in Canada, the US, and in France. Among his recent solo exhibitions are Maison de la culture Marie-Uguay (2018), Ceaac (2015), Strasbourg; Galerie Hugues Charbonneau (2014); L’Œil de Poisson (2014), Québec City; and the Musée régional de Rimouski (2012), which won the prize for “Best exhibition outside of Montréal” at the AGAC’s Gala des arts visuels. He recently participated in various group exhibitions, namely at the Musée d’art contemporain des Laurentides (2018), Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal (2015), l’Œil de Poisson (2015), Art Action Actuel, in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu (2013), and at the Centre d’art l’Écart, in Rouyn-Noranda (2013).

 

His work is part of several private and public collections, including the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (CPOA), the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec; the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montréal; Lotto Québec; Hydro-Québec; and Mouvement Desjardins.

Cindy Phenix: Ces femmes tiennent une fleur à la main

August 24th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Cindy Phenix, The Light Does Not Increase, 2018
Huile et pastel sur toile
Oil and pastel on canvas
183 x 244 cm (72″ x 96″)

The Exhibition

For her first solo exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Cindy Phenix is presenting Ces femmes tiennent une fleur à la main, a new series of paintings that are the fruit of a month-long residence at the gallery where Phenix set up her studio and initiated participation/discussion groups from which she drew inspiration.

With Ces femmes tiennent une fleur à la main, Phenix has developed a lexicon of happiness that pays heed to the complexity of the places it flourishes in and the attitudes it gives rise to. Beaches, boulevards, balconies or cabarets, these spaces where it unfolds are both public and private: there where the multitude becomes a crowd, thousands of isles of intimacy emerge. Voluptuousness, contemplation and friendship blossom there, but also along with voyeurism, vanity and envy. True to her forceful and intense aesthetic, Phenix alternates between solitary depictions and choral scenes to give life to an ode to boundless joy.

Cindy Phenix, Ces femmes qui tiennent une fleur à la main, 2018

Artist Statement

Cindy Phenix’s work focuses on the relationship between the public and private spheres. She explores the various norms that govern them, the dynamic of their coexistence, the power relations they are the site of and the emotions they trigger. To this end, the artist creates complex scenes that convey powerful narrative and affective movements.

Phenix draws her inspiration from participation/discussion groups that she organizes and leads. Through collaborative projects and shared experiences, these groups aim to raise awareness of feminine experience. At first, the women are led to interact with artworks, to take part in games and to position their bodies in installations created by the artist. They are then invited to share anecdotes and reflections as part of the discussions that Phenix guides. The bodily performances and stories shared in the process serve as fertile analysis ground for the artist who reinterprets them in her compositions.

Cindy Phenix’s paintings generate a palpable formal tension. Some surfaces are made up of gestural and abstract impastos, while others—left untouched—reveal the raw potential of the canvass. Painted zones are juxtaposed with drawn lines and take us into paradoxical spaces. Many characters, depicted in transformed complexions and bodies, interact here. The ambitious and ambiguous displays and the broad spectrum of techniques that Phenix puts to the task give rise to a dazzling emotional charge.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost: Introduction

March 1st, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening on Wednesday, March 14 from 5pm to 7pm. Artist in attendance.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost
La main d’Émilie Gamelin, 2017
Impression jet d’encre sur coton
Ink jet print on cotton
208 x 200 cm (81,89” x 74,74”) | 208 x 138 cm (81,89” x 54,33”) | 208 x 128 cm (81,89” x 50,39”)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present Introduction an exhibition by Guillaume Adjutor Provost. The artist invites you to this articulation of selected works from his exhibitions Matériellement rien, potentiellement tout (Diagonale, 2017), Providence (Association des travailleurs grecs du Québec / Clark / La SERRE, 2017) and Bonne Fortune (Clark, 2016). Through a re-exhibition of his body of work, the artist proposes a discovery, with him, of the milestones of his art practice. Given that this is the first time in his career that he is represented by a gallery, he is seizing the opportunity to explore the reference points of his artistic language. It is in view of this that he chose to use the exhibition space as a post-production site.

This retrospective exhibition presents the mainlines of Guillaume Adjutor Provost’s practice: referentiality, curatorial approaches, textuality, archival and photographic languages, psychedelic manifestations. Guided by an attitude of conceptual materialism, the artist’s practice inherently reveals zones of immaterial reflections buttressed by the physical object. Through their thoughts and interactions, viewers actively contribute to defining the artist’s language. With Introduction, the encounter with iconographic works by Guillaume Adjutor thus becomes the site of a truly fertile analysis.

About Guillaume Adjutor Provost   

Lives and works in Montreal where he completed a doctorate in art and research at UQAM in 2017. Guillaume Adjutor Provost has received grants from the Conseil des Arts et des Lettres du Québec, the Canada Council for the Art, the OJIQ and the Sodec. His work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Canada, France, Germany, Belgium, Catalonia and Switzerland. In parallel, his practice has been highlighted through the Jean-Claude Rochefort award and the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art. Since autumn 2016, he has been provided with a studio at the Fonderie Darling. In 2018, he will present a solo exhibition curated by Chloé Grondeau and Marthe Carrier at the artist centre Bikini in Lyon, participate in the exhibition … Move or be Moved by Something Rather than Oneself at Critical Distance (Toronto) curated by Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau and Maude Johnson, and carry out a research residency at Fondation Rupert in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Cynthia Girard-Renard : Love and Anarchy

November 10th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Plaisir fétichiste d’une militante antifasciste
(série Amour et anarchie)
2017
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
150 x 124 cm (59” x 49”)

Opening reception Saturday November 11, 3 PM to 5 PM. Artist in attendance.

Love and Anarchy
Cynthia Girard-Renard invites you to her latest project titled Love and Anarchy, inspired by the film of director Lina Wertmüller within which the action takes place inside a brothel under the ruling of Mussolini’s fascist Italy. The artist has elaborated 6 erotico-political paintings where inter-species characters mingle in a carnival of pleasure even if the days are dark and the speculative scenarios apocalyptical.

Inspired by a constellation of women artists and works such as the erotic paintings of Dorothy Iannone, the body art of Carolee Schneemann and the ecosexual movement of Annie Sprinkle, Girard-Renard has produced a body of work in which polymorphous figures, intertwined between plant, human and animal, are copulating and are in exaltation, defying passivity and the status quo. Figures constructed from her own body prints cavort within a ground printed directly from tree trunks. These bark backgrounds are the perfect burlesque theater to animate this vigorous troupe of characters who defy obscurantist scenarios with satirical playlets.

About Cynthia Girard-Renard 

Cynthia Girard-Renard received her MFA from Goldsmiths College, London, UK (1998). In the fall 2017, she takes part in the Canadian Biennial presented at the National Gallery of Canada and she presents her solo exhibition Our Mad Masters at the Musée d’art de Joliette. For more than 20 years, she has been actively exhibiting in Canada and internationally, including: Uma Certa Falta de Coerencia, Porto, Portugal (2015); Esker Foundation, Calgary, Alberta (2014); Thousand Plateaus Art Space, Chengdu, China (2011); Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina (2010); Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (2010); September Gallery, Berlin (2009); Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2009); SPACE, London (2006); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2005); etc.

The artist has been the recipient of grants from the Canada Council for the Arts and the Conseil des arts et des lettres du Québec to partake in residencies in London, Paris, New York and Berlin. Girard-Renard’s work is found in the collections of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Canadian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the Carleton University Art Gallery, the UQAM Gallery, the TD Bank as well as many private collections. Cynthia Girard-Renard lives and works in Montréal.

Situation #7 : David Lafrance : Forbidden Rendez-vous in the Ghost Wing

August 16th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Entrance door: 6217 rue Henri-Julien

 

David Lafrance
Atelier rouge (série Peur de perdre)
2015
Huile sur panneau
Oil on panel
20 x 25,5 cm (8” x 10”)

David Lafrance is delighted to invite you to his studio in the ghost wing of 305 rue de Bellechasse on next Wednesday August 23, from 10 AM to 10 PM. As part of our summer program titled “8 situations: 8 artists”, this exceptional rendezvous will be an opportunity to revisit his artistic production and archives covering the last twenty years (1997-2017).

David Lafrance
Étude pour Atlas No 2
2014
Peinture à l’acrylique sur madrier de ferme sculpté
Acrylic paint on sculpted recycled wood
35.5 x 10 x 18 cm (14” x 4” x 7”)

An installation of works will pay tribute to his favourite workspace. Several paintings, drawings, engravings, aquarelles, sketches, studies and some never-before-seen works will be available for acquisition purposes. This meeting will also be an occasion for open discussions with key art milieu professionals in attendance (artists, photographers, gallerists). A not to be missed event that will unfold in a convivial ambiance, in the image of David Lafrance.

David Lafrance
Force
2003
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
198 x 259 cm (78” x 102”)

About David Lafrance

David Lafrance (b. 1976) holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Concordia University in Montréal (2001). His work has been presented in numerous exhibitions and biennales in Canada, the US, and in France. Among his recent solo exhibitions are Ceaac (2015), Strasbourg; Galerie Hugues Charbonneau (2014); L’Œil de Poisson (2014), Québec City; and the Musée régional de Rimouski (2012), which won the prize for “Best exhibition outside of Montréal” at the AGAC’s Gala des arts visuels. He recently participated in various group exhibitions, namely at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal (2015), l’Œil de Poisson (2015), Art Action Actuel, in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu (2013), and at the Centre d’art l’Écart, in Rouyn-Noranda (2013).

David Lafrance
M’as tu oublier 07
2003
Graphite sur papier
Graphite on paper
55,88 x 76,2 (22” x 30”)

His work is part of several private and public collections, including the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (CPOA), the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec; the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montréal; Lotto Québec; Hydro-Québec; and Movement Desjardins; Blakes; and Apollo Studios.

David Lafrance
Les sinistrés
2011
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
107 x 122 cm (42” x 48”)

David Lafrance
En ordre d’apparition 01
2016
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 102 cm (48” x 40”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot — Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images

March 10th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Lunettes superposantes, 2016 Lunettes modifiées et miroirs Modified glasses and mirror

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Lunettes superposantes, 2016
Lunettes modifiées et miroirs
Modified glasses and mirror

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present a new exhibition by Jean-Benoit Pouliot in which he adopts a conceptual and reflexive approach to the painting object. The different states of this exploration variously take shape in photography, painting and in installation or sculpture.

Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images is a project that investigates the image/object relationship through an active reflection on the contemporary conditions of the image’s appearance, transformation and distribution. Jean-Benoit Pouliot takes his own production of abstract paintings as a staring point to release the images that are inherent in them; these images will consequently be free, flexible and will continue to follow their course independently of their primary support. Does the image keep on moving beyond the point where the painting ends? If yes, in what shapes? In what spaces?

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Glissement découpé 1, 2015 Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra 36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Glissement découpé 1, 2015
Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra
Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra
36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Nowadays the image can be easily detached from its primary physical reality: it can move, appear and disappear on command depending on the digital vessel that is conveying it. Jean-Benoit Pouliot has sought to contain this new image ubiquity by personally directing several second lives of his paintings along hypothetical paths.The interventions he carries out deeply probe the physical relation that the painting intrinsically sets up between the image and the object. In the gallery space this process triggers a play of echoes between the canvasses and their photographic, textual and sculptural iterations. The paintings were digitized, stretched, cut up, photocopied, put under the microscope or described in words. This approach on several fronts enables the artist to foreground the limits and impacts of digital media in our relationship to the image. Jean-Benoit Pouliot stages his paintings and by the same token, he reframes the way in which we behold them. In reflecting the image by way of the painting, he proposes to take the time to “re-view” the painting by way of the image.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Sans-titre, 2017 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Sans-titre, 2017
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot

Jean-Benoit Pouliot (b. 1975) is a self-taught artist who began his career in the early 2000s through the medium of printmaking. Painting gained a central place in his practice in 2008, and since then, Pouliot has participated in several solo and group exhibitions in Canada and the United-States. He has also participated in Nuit Blanche Toronto (2016), the public art happening Aires libres in Montréal (2014), the Extreme Painting event in Montréal (2013 and 2010), as well as the Multi Month 10 in Québec City (2009). His works are in numerous private and institutional collections, such as the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Loto-Québec, National Bank, Bank of Montreal, TD Bank, Mouvement Desjardins, and the collection of the Cirque du Soleil, among others.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

A Comfortable Indifference: Benoit Aquin, Cynthia Girard-Renard, Isabelle Hayeur et David Lafrance

June 1st, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Benoit Aquin Genghis Khan, Mongolie (série Le Dust Bowl chinois) Genghis Khan, Mongolia (The Chinese Dust Bowl), 2006 Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 5 : 61 x 91 cm (24

Benoit Aquin
Genghis Khan, Mongolie (série Le Dust Bowl chinois)
Genghis Khan, Mongolia (The Chinese Dust Bowl), 2006
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 5 : 61 x 91 cm (24″ x 36”)
Éd. 7 : 81 x 122 cm (32″ x 48″)

A Comfortable Indifference 

For its summer exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau presents a selection of works that highlight the challenging conciliation between the capitalist system and the environmental movement.

Clearly, time is running out while the acceleration of global warming endangers human populations, threatens biodiversity and causes extreme weather events. Denial is no longer an option. And yet, the unrestrained quest for economic growth and our current dependence on fossil fuels compromises our efforts to limit the increase in global temperatures and the decarbonisation of the economy. A shift toward united and sustainable principles must be taken on a global, local and individual level.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Décroissance/ Degrowth, 2014 Acrylique sur mousseline de coton Acrylic on muslin  397 x 300 cm (156 1/4

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Décroissance/ Degrowth, 2014
Acrylique sur mousseline de coton
Acrylic on muslin
397 x 300 cm (156 1/4″ x 118″)
(Photo : Guy L’Heureux)

In the gallery, Benoit Aquin invites us to confront two human-made environmental disasters. First, his celebrated project, The Chinese “Dust Bowl” (2006-2009), portrays the desertification of the former Silk Road in Inner Mongolia, while his series, Mégantic (2013), documents the worst land-based oil spill to date in North America – now emblematic of the careless management surrounding the hydrocarbon lobby. For her part, Cynthia Girard-Renard presents a large painting from her project Unicorns and Dictators (2014), first exhibited at the Esker Foundation in Calgary. The work features a hybrid character reminiscent of a trickster, with smoke-belching factories for ears. He is surrounded by anxious rabbits inquiring about the future, while greenish clouds inscribed with words like, ‘NATURE’, ‘PROFIT’, and ‘CAPITAL’, drift overhead.

Isabelle Hayeur Écume d'étang (série Underworld), 2015 Édition 5 127 x 91 cm (50

Isabelle Hayeur
Écume d’étang (série Underworld), 2015
Édition 5
127 x 91 cm (50″ x 36″)

Isabelle Hayeur takes us elsewhere entirely – underwater – with her multi-year project Underworlds (2008-2015), documenting aquatic scenes of completely impaired ecosystems. This unusual vantage point effectively portrays the degradation of various bodies of water through urbanisation and massive industrialisation. Finally, David Lafrance’s series titled Earthships (2015), depicts the self-sustaining dwellings of the same name, juxtaposing these with miniature bucolic scenes and schematic or abstract interpretations of the homes’ energy efficient systems. Lafrance invites us to reflect on this fantasized green paradise, which sits diametrically opposed to our hyper-consumption and our technological dependence.

David Lafrance Earthship 07, 2015 Huile sur panneau Oil on panel 15 x 20 cm (6

David Lafrance
Earthship 07, 2015
Huile sur panneau
Oil on panel
15 x 20 cm (6″ x 8″)

The title of this exhibition was inspired by Josée Blanchette’s article “La confortable inconscience”, published in Le Devoir on February 26, 2016.

Julie Trudel: Bone Black and Titanium White — Transparency and distortion

April 6th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to present Julie Trudel’s second solo exhibition, featuring the latest development in her work with the materiality of colour. This series of approximately 10 three-dimensional paintings was created in 2015 during various artist residencies, and was presented in part at the Anna Leonowens Gallery at NSCAD University last fall.

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

With Bone Black and Titanium White—Transparency and Distortion, Julie Trudel continues to work with the self-imposed chromatic constraint she adopted in 2012, namely the use of pure black and white pigments which she simply dilutes in large amounts of clear acrylic medium. This time, however, she has innovated her approach by adding clear acrylic supports (also known as Plexiglas). Technical considerations at the end of 2014 led her to choose this material as a way to explore its material properties – transparency, reflection, reversibility and plasticity – in conjunction with her fascination for the translucence and opacity of paint. While experimenting with various types of plastics, light emerged as a central component and the paintings were subsequently pulled out from the wall to better enable the interplay of light and surface.

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion BNNN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion BNNN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

Each piece is created on a very thin sheet of Plexiglas painted on one side before being bent into three sections through thermoforming. Two sections are painted in flat black tints, giving them a mirror-like quality, or in white, which reflects light. The third section is clear and covered in a pattern of translucent dots that seem to break away from the surface, producing the illusion of movement and depth. The folding of the two panels on either side of the central one produces a complex interplay of reflections between the three sections, while the concave shape it creates captures light and multiplies the effect of transparency or distortion within the cluster of dots. Trudel’s choice of Plexiglas has evidently deepened her research into the materiality of colour and light, thereby opening new possibilities within the pictorial field. Moreover, their presentation in the gallery allows viewers to experience the near-sculptural nature of her paintings as they extend into the exhibition space, and to witness how dramatically their appearance shifts depending on the angle of view.

Julie Trudel Noir d'ivoire et blanc de titane -- transparence et distorsion, 2016 Vue d'exposition Exhibition view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel
Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane — transparence et distorsion, 2016
Vue d’exposition
Exhibition view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel

Over the past five years, her work has been presented in France, in Germany, Japan, United-States, and throughout Canada. Trudel was a two-time finalist in the RBC Canadian Painting Competition (2011, 2012), and winner of the Joseph Plaskett Award in painting (2013). Her work is included in several collections, including the Collection Prêt d’œuvres d’art of the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec; the Ville de Montréal; RBC Bank and TD Bank. She lives and works in Montréal.

The artist would like to warmly thank the Joseph Plaskett Foundation, the Triangle Arts Association, NSCAD University and the Robert Pope Foundation, who supported the development of this new project. She would also like to acknowledge the contribution of her skilful and reliable studio assistants, Katie Lesser and Arkadi Lavoie Lachapelle, as well as Donald Thompson, Martin Schop and Atelier Clark, who helped resolve many technical challenges.

Julie Trudel Noir d'ivoire et blanc de titane -- transparence et distorsion, 2016 Vue d'exposition Exhibition view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel
Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane — transparence et distorsion, 2016
Vue d’exposition
Exhibition view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Cynthia Girard-Renard: La revanche des Sans-culottes

February 18th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

La revanche des Sans-culottes

For her first solo exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Cynthia Girard-Renard proposes a body of work created during the CALQ residency in Paris in 2015 and presented last fall in Porto, Portugal, under the title Les Sans-culottes. For the present exhibition, the series has been enlarged to include several new works, and already-existing puppets, banners and paintings have been complexified and reused. Girard-Renard’s starting point is the French Revolution, from which she develops a critical reflection on revolutionary thought in our current context of neoliberal austerity.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015 Acrylique sur toile libre de coton Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas 224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015
Acrylique sur toile libre de coton
Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas
224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

La revanche des Sans-culottes borrows its irreverent and comical energy from the caricatural social satire genre in 18th century France, an important influence for Girard-Renard during the development of the project. The title of the exhibition refers to the derogatory moniker applied to working-class protesters, that wore trousers or striped skirts, rather than the “culotte”, knickers favored by the Ancien Régime aristocracy. Girard-Renard stages confrontations between the monarchy and the people through an array of works depicting the decadence of Marie-Antoinette and Louis XVI’s court, which she compares to the voracity of today’s oligarchs and millionaires. The luxury industry, fashion, and finance collide with the threat of debt in Greece and the ubiquitous austerity that clobbers us in Québec, Europe and elsewhere – not unlike Punch’s beating-stick.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016 Techniques mixtes Mixed media 240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

In the gallery space, Le petit théâtre du grand capital (2016) depicts this confrontation between the 99% and the elusive and shapeshifting 1%. Puppets and papier mâché props adopt the burlesque and ribald codes of the Théâtre du Grand-Guignol, active in Paris from 1896 to 1963. For its part, the theatrical curtain of Sous les pavés, la plage (2015), a reference to the famous May 1968 slogan, acts as a bridge between the exhibition and 1789, invoking past revolutionary ardor and defiantly taking a stand against mediocrity’s dominion.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Les Sans-culottes, 2015 Papier, bois et corde Paper, wood and rope 167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Les Sans-culottes, 2015
Papier, bois et corde
Paper, wood and rope
167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard

For more than 20 years, Girard-Renard has been actively exhibiting in Canada and internationally, including: Esker Foundation, Calgary (2014); Thousand Plateaus Art Space, Chengdu, China (2011); Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina (2010); Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (2010); September Gallery, Berlin (2009); Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2009); SPACE, London (2006), not to mention her solo exhibition, Fictions sylvestres, at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2005) and her participation in the 2008 Quebec Triennial. Girard-Renard’s work is found in the collections of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Carleton University Art Gallery, the UQAM Gallery, as well as many private collections. The artist lives and works in Montréal.

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Jean-Benoit Pouliot: Counterpoints

September 29th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Jean-Benoît Pouliot Sans titre 2013-2014 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 170 x 132 cm (67

Jean-Benoît Pouliot
Sans titre
2013-2014
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
170 x 132 cm (67″ x 52″)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to present its second solo exhibition of work by the artist Jean-Benoit Pouliot. The assembled works each activate, in their own singular way, the notion of ‘counterpoint’, as borrowed from the world of music, referencing a compositional technique based on the layering of several independent melodies.

Jean-Benoît Pouliot Sans titre 2013-2014 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 170 x 132 cm (67

Jean-Benoît Pouliot
Sans titre
2013-2014
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
170 x 132 cm (67″ x 52″)

Contrepoints

The artist invites the viewer to consider the uniqueness of each painting as the basis of a perceptual experience that unfolds separately from the idea of a finished body of work, set in time. In this way, the exhibition’s common denominator is not a particular theme developed as a series, but rather, is considered in the broadest sense of the artist’s methodology, which over the past fifteen years has explored concepts of rhythm, transparency and accidents, through painting, performance, printmaking or photography. Contrepoints also seeks to demonstrate the influence and the importance of time in the work of Jean-Benoit Pouliot. In the studio, the artist works on several paintings simultaneously, thereby establishing a dialogue between pieces that are barely begun and others that are near completion. In this way, the interruptions he provokes become a determining compositional factor in the constructive process of the works, since the artist suspends the paintings in a provisional state that opens their potential, not only for action in the present, but also for external pictorial influences. This notion of a continuum, or temporal flow, linking each of these finished and in-progress works in all their singularity, allows the exhibition space to transform itself into an open, neutral ground, where formal comparisons can be liberally made and unmade between the works.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot  Sans titre 2014 acrylique sur toile acrylic on canvas 20.5 x 15 cm (8” x 6”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Sans titre
2014
acrylique sur toile
acrylic on canvas
20.5 x 15 cm (8” x 6”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot

Jean-Benoit Pouliot (b. 1975) is a self-taught artist who began his career in the early 2000s through the medium of printmaking. Painting gained a central place in his practice in 2008, and since then, Pouliot has participated in several solo and group exhibitions in Québec and in New York. He has also participated in the public art happening Aires libres in Montréal (2014), the Extreme Painting event in Montréal (2013 and 2010), as well as the Multi Month 10 in Québec City (2009). His works are in numerous private and institutional collections, such as the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Loto-Québec, National Bank, Bank of Montreal, TD Bank, Mouvement Desjardins, and the collection of the Cirque du Soleil, among others. Jean-Benoit Pouliot is represented by Galerie Hugues Charbonneau in Montréal. The artist lives and works in Montréal.

Pouliot2014-2

Pouliot2014-1

Pouliot2014-3

David Lafrance: Summer 2014

July 17th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

David Lafrance Rebutoir 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on Canvas 122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance
Rebutoir
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

The exhibition

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau presents a solo exhibition of works by Montreal artist David Lafrance. Observational drawings from the Montérégie region are shown alongside paintings created subsequently in his studio. These cognitive representations of the countryside stem from deep introspection, and evoke the memory of place and the current dynamics that inhabit it.

The large canvases on display often suggest landscapes, and benefit from the artist’s vast visual repertoire, simultaneously encompassing folk art imagery, pastoral scenes created through the subtle layering of glazes, maps sketched in freehand, and expressive impasto techniques.

Among the depicted scenes, symbols from popular culture become cultural clues in themselves. Folk art objects or modern relics inscribed within these turbulent landscapes offer a glimpse into our industrialized society’s relationship with nature. Indeed, the troubling yet seductive environments created by the artist through the amalgamation of anachronistic objects become cathartic tools to express life’s paradoxical impulses. These dichotomies, where symbolically charged objects cohabit in natural, yet unidentifiable spaces, trigger a narrative discourse that foregrounds the complex relationship modern humans have with their environment. Nature and civilisation meet in Lafrance’s creative work, allowing us to revisit our preconceived notions of reality.

David Lafrance St-Philippe 2014 Fusain sur papier Charcoal on paper 38 x 53 cm (15” x 21”)

David Lafrance
St-Philippe
2014
Fusain sur papier
Charcoal on paper
38 x 53 cm (15” x 21”)

Artist’s statement

Painter, sculptor and sound installation artist, Lafrance creates unique works where an exalted natural world unfolds and merges with elements of human life. Through the creation of Edenic landscapes, Lafrance explores his own psyche and awakens his sensitive spirit to test the limits of expressionism. Within the artist’s practice, where basic subjectivity is laid bare, expressiveness is used to explore human cognitive reflexes and reveal specific points of view. By doing so, the artist uses art’s expressivity to confer critical value upon it. Indeed, Lafrance’s enigmatic work generally revolves around dissenting themes such as escapist pursuits, industrialization, nature, or individual and collective identity.

David Lafrance Un atelier à la campagne 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 183 x 274 cm (72” x 108”)

David Lafrance
Un atelier à la campagne
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
183 x 274 cm (72” x 108”)

David Lafrance 20 000 ans 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance
20 000 ans
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance La vie après 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 102 x 114 cm (40” x 45”)

David Lafrance
La vie après
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
102 x 114 cm (40” x 45”)

David Lafrance Usine 05 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 38 x 58 cm (15” x 23”)

David Lafrance
Usine 05
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
38 x 58 cm (15” x 23”)

David Lafrance Usine 08 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 31 x 41 cm (12” x 16”)

David Lafrance
Usine 08
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
31 x 41 cm (12” x 16”)

David-Lafrance-Ete2014-0

Lafrance-Ete2014-1

David-Lafrance-Ete2014-2

ECHO 2: Against the Grain of History

May 24th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Benoit Aquin Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti) 2011 Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″ Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Benoit Aquin
Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti)
2011
Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″
Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Trevor Gould The Man who Walked Over the Moon 2008 Aquarelle Watercolour 41 x 31 cm (16

Trevor Gould
The Man who Walked Over the Moon
2008
Aquarelle
Watercolour
41 x 31 cm (16″ x 12,25″)

Trevor Gould Heritage, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould
Heritage, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould Echo 1, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Trevor Gould
Echo 1, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Maria Hupfield Step (Plural Positions series #14) 2014 Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Step (Plural Positions series #14)
2014
Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique
Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Seven (Plural Positions series #13) 2014 Feutre et fil de coton Felt and cotton tread 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Seven (Plural Positions series #13)
2014
Feutre et fil de coton
Felt and cotton tread
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Universal Parallels 2014 Feutre, fil à coudre Felt, sowing tread 30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”) Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield
Universal Parallels
2014
Feutre, fil à coudre
Felt, sowing tread
30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”)
Éd. unique

David Lafrance Video poker 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 203 x 183 cm (80

David Lafrance
Video poker
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
203 x 183 cm (80″ x 72″)
(Photo : Éliane Excoffier)

David Lafrance Nuit d'élections 2014 Acrylique sur papier Acrylic on paper 76 x 56 cm (30

David Lafrance
Nuit d’élections
2014
Acrylique sur papier
Acrylic on paper
76 x 56 cm (30″ x 22″)

Karen Tam I May Flirt a Little, but I'm no Yellow Peril 2009 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 90 x 40,5 cm (35,5

Karen Tam
I May Flirt a Little, but I’m no Yellow Peril
2009
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
90 x 40,5 cm (35,5″ x 16″)
Éd. 5

Karen Tam The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 13 x 68 cm (5.12

Karen Tam
The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible
2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
13 x 68 cm (5.12″ x 26.77″)
Éd. 4

Karen Tam  Do you mind if I smoke? 2008 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 30 x 30 cm (11.81

Karen Tam
Do you mind if I smoke?
2008
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
30 x 30 cm (11.81″ x 11.81″)
Éd.: 5

Karen Tam  Peeping Tom 2008 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 43 x 61 cm (24

Karen Tam
Peeping Tom
2008
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
43 x 61 cm (24″ x 16.93″)
Éd. : 5

The artist Karen Tam would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

CCFA_RGB_colour_f

point, line, plane, point, line, plane, point, line, plane

June 27th, 2013 § 1 comment § permalink

Pouliot - Point ligne plan - photo Eliane Excoffier

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, installation Point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan (photo Eliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, installation Point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan (photo Eliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, installation Point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan (photo Eliane Excoffier)

Julie Trudel & Tammi Cambell, installation Point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan (photo Eliane Excoffier)

Julie Trudel & Tammi Cambell, installation Point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan (photo Eliane Excoffier)

Tammi Campbell, installation Point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan (photo Eliane Excoffier)

Tammi Campbell, installation Point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan, point, ligne, plan (photo Eliane Excoffier)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, Sans titre (2013d), 2013, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 67

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, Sans titre (2013d), 2013, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 67″ x 52″

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, Sans titre (2013b), 2013, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 20

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, Sans titre (2013b), 2013, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 20″ x 16″

Jean-Benoît Pouliot, Sans titre (2013e), 2013, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 67

Jean-Benoît Pouliot, Sans titre (2013e), 2013, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 67″ x 52″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Familles (hannah02), 2012, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 16.5

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Familles (hannah02), 2012, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 16.5″ x 16.5″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Familles (hannah04),  2012, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 16

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Familles (hannah04), 2012, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 16″ x 16″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Familles (hannah03),  2012, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 16

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Familles (hannah03), 2012, acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 16″ x 16″

Julie Trudel, Étude 5A, du projet CMYK, 2011, acrylique et encre de sérigraphie sur contreplaqué, acrylique and silkscreen ink on plywood, diam. 29

Julie Trudel, Étude 5A, du projet CMYK, 2011, acrylique et encre de sérigraphie sur contreplaqué, acrylique and silkscreen ink on plywood, diam. 29″ (74 cm)

Julie Trudel, EllipseCMCYCK (2011-18), 2011,  acrylique et encre de sérigraphie sur contreplaqué, acrylique and silkscreen ink on plywood, 18

Julie Trudel, EllipseCMCYCK (2011-18), 2011, acrylique et encre de sérigraphie sur contreplaqué, acrylique and silkscreen ink on plywood, 18″ x 29″

Tammi Campbell, from Circle Tape series (april 2012 A), 2012, acrylique sur carton musée, acrylic on museum board, 38

Tammi Campbell, from Circle Tape series (april 2012 A), 2012, acrylique sur carton musée, acrylic on museum board, 38″ x 32″

Tammi Campbell, from Circle Tape series (april 2012 B), 2012, acrylique sur carton musée, acrylic on museum board, 38

Tammi Campbell, from Circle Tape series (april 2012 B), 2012, acrylique sur carton musée, acrylic on museum board, 38″ x 32″

Tammi Campbell, Dear Agnes (004), 2011, graphite sur papier japonais Kozo plié, graphite on folded Kozo Japanese paper, 11” x 8 ½”

Tammi Campbell, Dear Agnes (004), 2011, graphite sur papier japonais Kozo plié, graphite on folded Kozo Japanese paper, 11” x 8 ½”

Tammi Campbell, Dear Agnes (006), 2011, graphite sur papier japonais Kozo plié, graphite on folded Kozo Japanese paper, 11” x 8 ½”

Tammi Campbell, Dear Agnes (006), 2011, graphite sur papier japonais Kozo plié, graphite on folded Kozo Japanese paper, 11” x 8 ½”

Tammi Campbell, Dear Agnes (030), 2012, graphite sur papier japonais Kozo plié, graphite on folded Kozo Japanese paper, 11” x 8 ½”

Tammi Campbell, Dear Agnes (030), 2012, graphite sur papier japonais Kozo plié, graphite on folded Kozo Japanese paper, 11” x 8 ½”

Marie-Claude Bouthillier : Mégalithes

May 25th, 2013 § Comments Off on Marie-Claude Bouthillier : Mégalithes § permalink

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 06, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 06, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59″ x 47″, 150 x 120 cm

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Astrolithe, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylique on canvas, 20 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Astrolithe, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylique on canvas, 20 1/2″ x 14 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 05, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 05, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 59″ x 47″, 150 x 120 cm

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes (nébuleuse), Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 33 (étoile), 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 12

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 33 (étoile), 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 12″ x 11″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 11, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 24

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 11, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 24″ x 24″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe (pierre blanche), 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 15 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe (pierre blanche), 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 15 1/2″ x 11 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 21, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 21, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2″ x 16 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 23, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 23, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2″ x 16 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 25, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 25, 2012, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 16 1/2″ x 16 1/2″

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 02, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 82.5

Marie-Claude Bouthilier, Mégalithe 02, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 82.5″ x 59″, 210 x 150 cm

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithes, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, 2013 (photo : Éliane Excoffier)

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, MM et Mégalithe, 2001-2013, encaustique, carbone, acrylique et huile sur papier, encaustic, carbon, acrilic and oil on paper, 15 1/2

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, MM et Mégalithe, 2001-2013, encaustique, carbone, acrylique et huile sur papier, encaustic, carbon, acrilic and oil on paper, 15 1/2″ x 10 3/4″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 36, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 36, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36″ x 36″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 37, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 37, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36″ x 36″

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 38, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36

Marie-Claude Bouthillier, Mégalithe 38, 2013, carbone et acrylique sur toile, carbon and acrylic on canvas, 36″ x 36″

Jean-Benoit Pouliot

September 22nd, 2012 § Comments Off on Jean-Benoit Pouliot § permalink

Photo : Éliane Excoffier

Les mauvais tableaux font des bonnes sculptures, 2012, photo : Éliane Excoffier

Les mauvais tableaux font des bonnes sculptures (détail), 2012, photo : Éliane Excoffier

Photo : Éliane Excoffier

Photo : Éliane Excoffier

Photo : Éliane Excoffier

Photo : Éliane Excoffier

Photo : Éliane Excoffier

Inauguration of the gallery

August 16th, 2012 § 0 comments § permalink

JEAN-BENOÎT POULIOT – OEUVRES RÉCENTES

22 septembre 2012, 14h à 17h

September 22nd, 2pm to 5pm

SÉRIE STACCATO

Sans, série staccato, 2012
acrylique sur toile, acrylic on canvas, 67″ X 52″

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