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Trevor Gould, Moridja Kitenge Banza and Cindy Phenix in residency

June 18th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Trevor Gould, Live in a Box: A Refuge, 2017
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
75,5 x 68,5 x 50,5 cm (29 3/4” x 27” x 20”)

Moridja Kitenge Banza, Chiromancie #9 No 11, 2019
Encre sur mylar
Ink on mylar
107 x 244 cm (42” x 96”)

Cindy Phenix, The End That Is Not, 2019
Pastel, huile, acrylique et tissus sur lin
Oil, acrylic pastel and found fabric on linen
121,9 x 91,4 cm (48” x 36”)

Guillaume Adjutor Provost: Chambre réverbérante

April 14th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening April 17 from 5 to 7pm

Guillaume Adjutor Provost, Sans titre (flux 03.05), 2019
Encre sur papier
Ink on paper
29,7 x 21 cm (11,7” x 8,3”)

For his second exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Chambre réverbérante, Guillaume Adjutor Provost is presenting a selection of drawings from his most recent series entitled Flux. These drawings result from a number of automatic-drawing sessions whereby each pen drawing on paper was executed over the course of several consecutive hours. During these late-night drawing shifts, Provost found himself in a state of altered consciousness provoked by self-induced hypnosis a hypnagogic state that allowed for a free-form exploration of his frame of mind on a given day. He likens the visual vocabulary resulting from this process to a flow of data streaming directly from his psyche.  

Pulling from shapes and hidden symbols that emerged during these sessions, Provost created two sculptures that echo the Fluxdrawings. Fée du Kapital (Shift de jour)and Fée du Kapital (Shift de nuit)represent two pairs of casted feet dressed and bejewelled in boots and fabrics. The presence of these dismembered feet in space create a tension, seeming to conjure up spirits. To the artist, these anchors are stand-ins for a system in deconstruction, they could be considered the foundation to the building of a new order.

Chambre réverbérante results from Guillaume Adjutor Provost’s current desire to create a body of work that bypasses referentiality in order to access the raw internal processes of the psyche and by the same token, expose our relationship to the unregulated labour inherent to artistic work, both material and immaterial.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost lives and works in Montreal where he completed a doctorate in art and research at UQAM in 2017. He has received grants from the Conseil des Arts et des Lettres du Québec, the Canada Council for the Arts, the OJIQ and SODEC. His work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions throughoutCanada, France, Germany, Belgium, Catalonia, Lithuania, and Switzerland. In parallel, his practice has been highlighted through the Jean-Claude Rochefort award and the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art. Since autumn 2016, he has been provided with a studio at the Fonderie Darling where he is currently showing a solo exhibition in conversation with Julie Tremble and Guillaume B.B. entitled “Vapeurs”, curated by Ji-Yoon Han. In 2018, he presented a solo exhibition at Bikini in Lyon, and participated in group shows at Critical Distance (Toronto) and TAP Art Space (Montreal), and conducted a research residency at Rupert Foundation in Vilnius, Lithuania.

 

Guillaume Adjutor Provost, Chambre réverbérante, 2019
Exposition / Exhibition
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada
(photo : Jean-Michael Seminaro)

 

 

Karen Tam (July) and Cindy Phenix (August)

June 20th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam
Work in Progress (for Art Toronto), 2018

Cindy Phenix
Sunflowers, 2018
Huile et pastel sur toile
Oil and pastel on canvas
76 x 61 cm (30” x 24”)

Interdependence/Indispensability: Benoit Aquin, Maria Hupfield and Karen Tam

April 30th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Opening on May 2 from 5 to 7pm

Benoit Aquin
Téléphones intelligents No.22. Los Angeles (série Anton Bequii ou La dimension éthérique du réseau), 2016
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival digital pigment print
Edition 5
102 x 152 cm (40’’ x 60’’)

This group exhibition brings together Benoit Aquin, Maria Hupfield, and Karen Tam, who use different approaches in their work to negotiate power relations between the individual, artifact, place, and history. Whether through the self and its other, or through digital or physical manipulation of the art object, re-enactment is a political gesture that simultaneously allows us to experience the past and present, yet can be used to transform and distort understandings of historical events and peoples. By appropriating methods of re-enactments, the artists challenge and resist conventional production and consumption of the self and the body (Hupfield), of information and knowledge (Aquin), and of culture (Tam).

Revisiting her performative photographic series, Counterpoint, in which two figures (the self and its other) respond to one another’s presence and to the locations in which they find themselves, Hupfield disrupts the original photographs by collaging felt cutouts atop the surface, obscuring one of the models. In doing so, the artist is reasserting an individual identity and contests practices of domination and social control.

Maria Hupfield
Resistance on All Fronts, 2007-2018
Épreuve chromogène et feutre industriel
C-print and industrial felt
Edition : unique
Photo: 102 x 76 cm (40” x 30”)

The double also appears in Aquin’s project based on the life and work of photographer Anton Bequii —an alter ego whose name is an anagram of Benoit Aquin. Documenting a parallel existence and reality, Bequii’s autofictive photographs are counter-sites to the dystopic illusions and transmission of (mis)information fed to us by mass media.

A similar mimicry occurs in Tam’s papier-mâché sculptures that activate historical artifacts through their replicas, as well as in her smoke cutouts depicting woman warriors in Chinese history and folklore as door gods who ward off evil spirits and influences. Through these mirrored figures and doubled objects, Tam questions modes of cultural production and interpretation.

Karen Tam
A Double Stream of Tears, 2018
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
64 x 23 x 23 cm (25 1/4” x 9” x 9”) ch/ea

Guillaume Adjutor Provost: Introduction

March 1st, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening on Wednesday, March 14 from 5pm to 7pm. Artist in attendance.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost
La main d’Émilie Gamelin, 2017
Impression jet d’encre sur coton
Ink jet print on cotton
208 x 200 cm (81,89” x 74,74”) | 208 x 138 cm (81,89” x 54,33”) | 208 x 128 cm (81,89” x 50,39”)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present Introduction an exhibition by Guillaume Adjutor Provost. The artist invites you to this articulation of selected works from his exhibitions Matériellement rien, potentiellement tout (Diagonale, 2017), Providence (Association des travailleurs grecs du Québec / Clark / La SERRE, 2017) and Bonne Fortune (Clark, 2016). Through a re-exhibition of his body of work, the artist proposes a discovery, with him, of the milestones of his art practice. Given that this is the first time in his career that he is represented by a gallery, he is seizing the opportunity to explore the reference points of his artistic language. It is in view of this that he chose to use the exhibition space as a post-production site.

This retrospective exhibition presents the mainlines of Guillaume Adjutor Provost’s practice: referentiality, curatorial approaches, textuality, archival and photographic languages, psychedelic manifestations. Guided by an attitude of conceptual materialism, the artist’s practice inherently reveals zones of immaterial reflections buttressed by the physical object. Through their thoughts and interactions, viewers actively contribute to defining the artist’s language. With Introduction, the encounter with iconographic works by Guillaume Adjutor thus becomes the site of a truly fertile analysis.

About Guillaume Adjutor Provost   

Lives and works in Montreal where he completed a doctorate in art and research at UQAM in 2017. Guillaume Adjutor Provost has received grants from the Conseil des Arts et des Lettres du Québec, the Canada Council for the Art, the OJIQ and the Sodec. His work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Canada, France, Germany, Belgium, Catalonia and Switzerland. In parallel, his practice has been highlighted through the Jean-Claude Rochefort award and the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art. Since autumn 2016, he has been provided with a studio at the Fonderie Darling. In 2018, he will present a solo exhibition curated by Chloé Grondeau and Marthe Carrier at the artist centre Bikini in Lyon, participate in the exhibition … Move or be Moved by Something Rather than Oneself at Critical Distance (Toronto) curated by Florence-Agathe Dubé-Moreau and Maude Johnson, and carry out a research residency at Fondation Rupert in Vilnius, Lithuania.

Jonathan Plante : Trois Sculptures

January 9th, 2018 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Jonathan Plante
Trois Sculptures, 2018
Exposition_Exhibition
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

 

Trois sculptures

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present Trois sculptures, an exhibition by Jonathan Plante. The exhibition reveals a series of three works from the artist’s recent production The exhibited sculptures take up the same structure, i.e. a three dimensional assemblage of eight lenticular supports. A lenticular support is an extruded plastic that functions like a series of lenses guiding the eye towards an image that will change according to the viewing angle of the viewer. Known for its commercial uses, lenticular support has been mostly used to manufacture ordinary objects. For example, a postcard that is waved backed back and forth to create the illusion of motion through two overlapping images.

By using the artisanal printing process of silkscreen to introduce an element of randomness, Plant disassociates the lenticular image from an advertising aesthetic. Through this deployment of the lenticular medium, the artist explores other modes to put the image into motion. Trois sculptures proposes an experience that shifts the opposition between activity and passivity characteristic of film. According to an approach he calls kinoplastic, it is the viewer’s movements that both freezes the image and puts it into motion. These works invite viewers to become aware of the fact that it is their movement that brings the world into appearance. A reflection that can also be traced back to the tradition of Robert Morris’s minimalist sculpture; a practice that involves both the materiality of the work and the experience of the viewer.

About Jonathan Plante

Jonathan Plante holds a MFA from Université du Québec à Montréal. His works have been presented in solo exhibitions at Galerie de l’UQAM, Galerie Division, at Musée d’art contemporain des Laurentides as well as De Ateliers in Amsterdam. He has also participated in various group exhibitions in Quebec, the US and the Netherlands. In 2017, L’œil de poisson in Quebec City showed his solo exhibition titled L’immobile. In 2013, the artist created Lapincyclope, the first of a series of exhibitions for a young viewership to be presented at VOX — Centre de l’image contemporaine in Montréal, in addition to taking part in the Quebec Triennial 2008. His works are currently part of several public and private collections among which Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal and Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec. Jonathan Plante lives and works in Montréal.

Situation #7 : David Lafrance : Forbidden Rendez-vous in the Ghost Wing

August 16th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Entrance door: 6217 rue Henri-Julien

 

David Lafrance
Atelier rouge (série Peur de perdre)
2015
Huile sur panneau
Oil on panel
20 x 25,5 cm (8” x 10”)

David Lafrance is delighted to invite you to his studio in the ghost wing of 305 rue de Bellechasse on next Wednesday August 23, from 10 AM to 10 PM. As part of our summer program titled “8 situations: 8 artists”, this exceptional rendezvous will be an opportunity to revisit his artistic production and archives covering the last twenty years (1997-2017).

David Lafrance
Étude pour Atlas No 2
2014
Peinture à l’acrylique sur madrier de ferme sculpté
Acrylic paint on sculpted recycled wood
35.5 x 10 x 18 cm (14” x 4” x 7”)

An installation of works will pay tribute to his favourite workspace. Several paintings, drawings, engravings, aquarelles, sketches, studies and some never-before-seen works will be available for acquisition purposes. This meeting will also be an occasion for open discussions with key art milieu professionals in attendance (artists, photographers, gallerists). A not to be missed event that will unfold in a convivial ambiance, in the image of David Lafrance.

David Lafrance
Force
2003
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
198 x 259 cm (78” x 102”)

About David Lafrance

David Lafrance (b. 1976) holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts from Concordia University in Montréal (2001). His work has been presented in numerous exhibitions and biennales in Canada, the US, and in France. Among his recent solo exhibitions are Ceaac (2015), Strasbourg; Galerie Hugues Charbonneau (2014); L’Œil de Poisson (2014), Québec City; and the Musée régional de Rimouski (2012), which won the prize for “Best exhibition outside of Montréal” at the AGAC’s Gala des arts visuels. He recently participated in various group exhibitions, namely at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal (2015), l’Œil de Poisson (2015), Art Action Actuel, in Saint-Jean-sur-Richelieu (2013), and at the Centre d’art l’Écart, in Rouyn-Noranda (2013).

David Lafrance
M’as tu oublier 07
2003
Graphite sur papier
Graphite on paper
55,88 x 76,2 (22” x 30”)

His work is part of several private and public collections, including the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (CPOA), the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec; the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montréal; Lotto Québec; Hydro-Québec; and Movement Desjardins; Blakes; and Apollo Studios.

David Lafrance
Les sinistrés
2011
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
107 x 122 cm (42” x 48”)

David Lafrance
En ordre d’apparition 01
2016
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 102 cm (48” x 40”)

Situation #4: Maria Hupfield : KA-POW!

July 18th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Public artwork KA-POW! on view at Victoria Square

As part of the Montreal 375th anniversary donation project “Promenade Fleuve-Montagne” #PromenadeFM.

Maria Hupfield
KA-POW!, 2017
Sculpture publique
Public sculpture
(Photo: Sébastien Roy, DHC\ART)

KA-POW!

 

The word KA-POW! speaks the language of action, force, movement, breath and sound. KA-POW! is comprised of two seated bench areas fixed amongst a grove of trees at Victoria Square park. Referencing lightening bolts, geometric star blanket patterns and cartoon action text bubbles the benches are a radical act of unity to bring more integration between public spaces and the more than human natural world. The geometric forms are anchored in many levels of meaning at ground level, supporting the public under a canopy of leaves. For this site specific commission Brooklyn based performance artist Maria Hupfield centers trees as dynamic living forces in an effort to bring people together with our relations a busy intersection. KA-POW! is part of le Sentier de résilience curated by Cheryl Sim in collaboration with Phi Centre and DHC/ART. It is located at the heart of la Promenade Fleuve-Montagne.

Maria Hupfield
KA-POW!, 2017
Sculpture publique
Public sculpture
(Photo: Sébastien Roy, DHC\ART)

Maria Hupfield
Hupfield activates her creations in live performance. She is interested in shared moments that open spaces for possibility and new narratives. She is deeply invested in intersectionality, indigenous feminisms, race, gender, and class. Hupfield is a member of the Anishinaabe Nation at Wasauksing First Nation, Ontario. Her recent traveling solo exhibition, The One Who Keeps On Giving, opened the thirtieth anniversary of the Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery, Toronto. Hupfield is an alumna of the AIM program at the Bronx Museum and a Joan Mitchell Foundation recipient. Exhibitions include shows at the SITE Santa Fe Biennial, James Gallery, the BRIC Biennial, the Bronx Museum, Vox Populi, and Panoply Performance Laboratory. Hupfield was also a part of the group exhibition Beat Nation. Art, Hip Hop and Aboriginal Culture (2012-2014) presented at the Vancouver Art Gallery, Power Plant Contemporary Art Gallery and the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal.

 

Jean-Benoit Pouliot — Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images

March 10th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Lunettes superposantes, 2016 Lunettes modifiées et miroirs Modified glasses and mirror

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Lunettes superposantes, 2016
Lunettes modifiées et miroirs
Modified glasses and mirror

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present a new exhibition by Jean-Benoit Pouliot in which he adopts a conceptual and reflexive approach to the painting object. The different states of this exploration variously take shape in photography, painting and in installation or sculpture.

Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images is a project that investigates the image/object relationship through an active reflection on the contemporary conditions of the image’s appearance, transformation and distribution. Jean-Benoit Pouliot takes his own production of abstract paintings as a staring point to release the images that are inherent in them; these images will consequently be free, flexible and will continue to follow their course independently of their primary support. Does the image keep on moving beyond the point where the painting ends? If yes, in what shapes? In what spaces?

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Glissement découpé 1, 2015 Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra 36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Glissement découpé 1, 2015
Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra
Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra
36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Nowadays the image can be easily detached from its primary physical reality: it can move, appear and disappear on command depending on the digital vessel that is conveying it. Jean-Benoit Pouliot has sought to contain this new image ubiquity by personally directing several second lives of his paintings along hypothetical paths.The interventions he carries out deeply probe the physical relation that the painting intrinsically sets up between the image and the object. In the gallery space this process triggers a play of echoes between the canvasses and their photographic, textual and sculptural iterations. The paintings were digitized, stretched, cut up, photocopied, put under the microscope or described in words. This approach on several fronts enables the artist to foreground the limits and impacts of digital media in our relationship to the image. Jean-Benoit Pouliot stages his paintings and by the same token, he reframes the way in which we behold them. In reflecting the image by way of the painting, he proposes to take the time to “re-view” the painting by way of the image.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Sans-titre, 2017 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Sans-titre, 2017
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot

Jean-Benoit Pouliot (b. 1975) is a self-taught artist who began his career in the early 2000s through the medium of printmaking. Painting gained a central place in his practice in 2008, and since then, Pouliot has participated in several solo and group exhibitions in Canada and the United-States. He has also participated in Nuit Blanche Toronto (2016), the public art happening Aires libres in Montréal (2014), the Extreme Painting event in Montréal (2013 and 2010), as well as the Multi Month 10 in Québec City (2009). His works are in numerous private and institutional collections, such as the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Loto-Québec, National Bank, Bank of Montreal, TD Bank, Mouvement Desjardins, and the collection of the Cirque du Soleil, among others.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

A Comfortable Indifference: Benoit Aquin, Cynthia Girard-Renard, Isabelle Hayeur et David Lafrance

June 1st, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Benoit Aquin Genghis Khan, Mongolie (série Le Dust Bowl chinois) Genghis Khan, Mongolia (The Chinese Dust Bowl), 2006 Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 5 : 61 x 91 cm (24

Benoit Aquin
Genghis Khan, Mongolie (série Le Dust Bowl chinois)
Genghis Khan, Mongolia (The Chinese Dust Bowl), 2006
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 5 : 61 x 91 cm (24″ x 36”)
Éd. 7 : 81 x 122 cm (32″ x 48″)

A Comfortable Indifference 

For its summer exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau presents a selection of works that highlight the challenging conciliation between the capitalist system and the environmental movement.

Clearly, time is running out while the acceleration of global warming endangers human populations, threatens biodiversity and causes extreme weather events. Denial is no longer an option. And yet, the unrestrained quest for economic growth and our current dependence on fossil fuels compromises our efforts to limit the increase in global temperatures and the decarbonisation of the economy. A shift toward united and sustainable principles must be taken on a global, local and individual level.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Décroissance/ Degrowth, 2014 Acrylique sur mousseline de coton Acrylic on muslin  397 x 300 cm (156 1/4

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Décroissance/ Degrowth, 2014
Acrylique sur mousseline de coton
Acrylic on muslin
397 x 300 cm (156 1/4″ x 118″)
(Photo : Guy L’Heureux)

In the gallery, Benoit Aquin invites us to confront two human-made environmental disasters. First, his celebrated project, The Chinese “Dust Bowl” (2006-2009), portrays the desertification of the former Silk Road in Inner Mongolia, while his series, Mégantic (2013), documents the worst land-based oil spill to date in North America – now emblematic of the careless management surrounding the hydrocarbon lobby. For her part, Cynthia Girard-Renard presents a large painting from her project Unicorns and Dictators (2014), first exhibited at the Esker Foundation in Calgary. The work features a hybrid character reminiscent of a trickster, with smoke-belching factories for ears. He is surrounded by anxious rabbits inquiring about the future, while greenish clouds inscribed with words like, ‘NATURE’, ‘PROFIT’, and ‘CAPITAL’, drift overhead.

Isabelle Hayeur Écume d'étang (série Underworld), 2015 Édition 5 127 x 91 cm (50

Isabelle Hayeur
Écume d’étang (série Underworld), 2015
Édition 5
127 x 91 cm (50″ x 36″)

Isabelle Hayeur takes us elsewhere entirely – underwater – with her multi-year project Underworlds (2008-2015), documenting aquatic scenes of completely impaired ecosystems. This unusual vantage point effectively portrays the degradation of various bodies of water through urbanisation and massive industrialisation. Finally, David Lafrance’s series titled Earthships (2015), depicts the self-sustaining dwellings of the same name, juxtaposing these with miniature bucolic scenes and schematic or abstract interpretations of the homes’ energy efficient systems. Lafrance invites us to reflect on this fantasized green paradise, which sits diametrically opposed to our hyper-consumption and our technological dependence.

David Lafrance Earthship 07, 2015 Huile sur panneau Oil on panel 15 x 20 cm (6

David Lafrance
Earthship 07, 2015
Huile sur panneau
Oil on panel
15 x 20 cm (6″ x 8″)

The title of this exhibition was inspired by Josée Blanchette’s article “La confortable inconscience”, published in Le Devoir on February 26, 2016.

Cynthia Girard-Renard: La revanche des Sans-culottes

February 18th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

La revanche des Sans-culottes

For her first solo exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Cynthia Girard-Renard proposes a body of work created during the CALQ residency in Paris in 2015 and presented last fall in Porto, Portugal, under the title Les Sans-culottes. For the present exhibition, the series has been enlarged to include several new works, and already-existing puppets, banners and paintings have been complexified and reused. Girard-Renard’s starting point is the French Revolution, from which she develops a critical reflection on revolutionary thought in our current context of neoliberal austerity.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015 Acrylique sur toile libre de coton Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas 224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015
Acrylique sur toile libre de coton
Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas
224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

La revanche des Sans-culottes borrows its irreverent and comical energy from the caricatural social satire genre in 18th century France, an important influence for Girard-Renard during the development of the project. The title of the exhibition refers to the derogatory moniker applied to working-class protesters, that wore trousers or striped skirts, rather than the “culotte”, knickers favored by the Ancien Régime aristocracy. Girard-Renard stages confrontations between the monarchy and the people through an array of works depicting the decadence of Marie-Antoinette and Louis XVI’s court, which she compares to the voracity of today’s oligarchs and millionaires. The luxury industry, fashion, and finance collide with the threat of debt in Greece and the ubiquitous austerity that clobbers us in Québec, Europe and elsewhere – not unlike Punch’s beating-stick.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016 Techniques mixtes Mixed media 240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

In the gallery space, Le petit théâtre du grand capital (2016) depicts this confrontation between the 99% and the elusive and shapeshifting 1%. Puppets and papier mâché props adopt the burlesque and ribald codes of the Théâtre du Grand-Guignol, active in Paris from 1896 to 1963. For its part, the theatrical curtain of Sous les pavés, la plage (2015), a reference to the famous May 1968 slogan, acts as a bridge between the exhibition and 1789, invoking past revolutionary ardor and defiantly taking a stand against mediocrity’s dominion.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Les Sans-culottes, 2015 Papier, bois et corde Paper, wood and rope 167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Les Sans-culottes, 2015
Papier, bois et corde
Paper, wood and rope
167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard

For more than 20 years, Girard-Renard has been actively exhibiting in Canada and internationally, including: Esker Foundation, Calgary (2014); Thousand Plateaus Art Space, Chengdu, China (2011); Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina (2010); Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (2010); September Gallery, Berlin (2009); Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2009); SPACE, London (2006), not to mention her solo exhibition, Fictions sylvestres, at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2005) and her participation in the 2008 Quebec Triennial. Girard-Renard’s work is found in the collections of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Carleton University Art Gallery, the UQAM Gallery, as well as many private collections. The artist lives and works in Montréal.

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam: Made in Britain

December 21st, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Opening: Saturday, January 17 from 3 to 5 PM, artist in attendance

Karen Tam’s work revolves around issues relating to the representation of Asia in America and Europe through art, literature, media and consumer goods. She questions this slightly distorted Orient: an Orient tailor-made to the taste of the Western market.

Karen Tam Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box  |  Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012 Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs Papier-mâché, gesso, markers 2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Karen Tam
Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box | Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012
Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs
Papier-mâché, gesso, markers
2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Through appropriation and subversive strategies, Tam meticulously reproduces antiques, ornaments, traditional Chinese cutouts, typical interiors of Chinese restaurants and even opium dens. Yet, the artist maintains a subtle distinction between the original source of inspiration and her own interpretation from which emerges a clear critique that activates cultural and identity issues relating to racism and the globalization of trade.

Karen Tam Sinography (Gold) Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm  Total : 243 x 168 cm

Karen Tam
Sinography (Gold)
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm
Total : 243 x 168 cm

Ironically, Tam’s sculptures and installations appropriate and magnify the aesthetics of this China fantasized by and for the West, through cutouts whose traditional iconography has been subverted, antique porcelain made from papier-mâché, and decorative lanterns out of cardboard.

Karen Tam From Frog's Robe to Crow's Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers 2009 Tissu découpé (brillant) Fabric cut-out (glitter) 143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

Karen Tam
From Frog’s Robe to Crow’s Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers
2009
Tissu découpé (brillant)
Fabric cut-out (glitter)
143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

The cultural overlap that these contemporary chinoiseries reflect triggers again the history of trade routes between ‘East’ and ‘West’; it recalls the Canadian government’s exclusionary policies towards the Chinese; it deals with the imaging of cultures through contact and stereotypes; just as it updates the question of authenticity in contemporary art using a cultural studies framework.

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

The exhibition Karen Tam. Made in Britain marks the return of the artist to Montreal, where her last solo show took place in 2005. The works presented for this occasion were made during the time she lived in London while completing her doctoral studies at Goldsmiths.

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011 Fausses perles, fil à pêche Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire 161 x 161 cm (63 1/2

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011
Fausses perles, fil à pêche
Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire
161 x 161 cm (63 1/2″ x 63 1/2″)

Karen Tam lives and works in Montreal, Britain and the United States. She holds a MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a PhD from the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. Since the 2000s, her work has been featured in exhibitions in Canada, Ireland, UK, Austria, United States, and China. She has been the recipient of multiple fellowships and grants and was on the longlist for the prestigious 2010 Sobey Art Award.

Karen Tam Rex vs. Quong, 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 57 x 81 cm (22 1/2

Karen Tam
Rex vs. Quong, 2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
57 x 81 cm (22 1/2″ x 32″)

www.karentam.ca

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