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Situation #1 : Françoise Sullivan. 

June 13th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Françoise Sullivan
Pourquoi les raffineries?1973-2017
Impression numérique
Digital print
Edition 15
102 x 76cm (40 1/4″ x 30″)
Photo: Guy L’Heureux

 

Unveiling of the work Pourquoi les raffineries? (Why the Refineries?)

At Galerie Hugues Charbonneau

With the kind collaboration of Galerie Simon Blais

(First event of the series 8 Artists; 8 Situations)

Françoise Sullivan, a signatory of the Refus global in 1948, to this day remains one of the most inspiring creative forces of our arts community. From very early on in her career, this accomplished pluri-disciplinary artist ventured beyond established art dissemination sites to work directly with nature and the city.

As an initial step to further this spirit of pushing the boundaries and challenging the norms of the contemporary art gallery, this coming June 21 we will inaugurate an original summer program. 8 artistic situations conceived by 8 artists will be displayed in outdoor and virtual spaces as part of this project

In our view, it was very apropos to invite Françoise Sullivan for the opening evening of this series of events. In addition to counting the artist among us, we will also have the honour to unveil one of her recent works: a digital assemblage based on the “walks” she performed in Montreal during the seventies.

The gridded composition is rhythmically punctuated in the manner of a musical score; it is carried by the artist’s gestures and the verticality of the stark smokestacks looming in and out of vision behind the billowing smoke of the oil refineries. With a highly effective economy of means, the contrast between the artist’s free movement and her austere surroundings refers us back to the work’s title: Why the Refineries?

The Gallery is grateful to the artist for her generous acceptance of this invitation. We also extend our thanks to Simon Blais and Paul Bradley for their enthusiastic contribution to this project.

After June 21, the work will be available for view by appointment only.

Benoit Aquin: 10th anniversary of the Chinese ‘‘Dust Bowl’’

May 2nd, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Benoit Aquin, 10e anniversaire du Dust Bowl chinois [exposition_exhibition]
2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is proud to exhibit six photographs excerpted from The Chinese “Dust Bowl” (2006-2008) series by Benoit Aquin. These works are coming back to Montréal following the Prix Pictet retrospective at the Mouravieff-Apostol House & Museum in Moscow. The exhibition will celebrate the 10th anniversary of the internationally acclaimed and award winning series of photographs documenting the human caused desertification of northern China and Inner Mongolia.

Benoit Aquin La motocyclette, Mongolie Intérieure (Le Dust Bowl chinois), 2006 Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 7 : 81 x 122 cm (32" x 48") Éd. 5 : 101 x 152 cm (40″ x 60″)

Benoit Aquin
La motocyclette, Mongolie Intérieure (Le Dust Bowl chinois), 2006
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 7 : 81 x 122 cm (32″ x 48″)
Éd. 5 : 101 x 152 cm (40″ x 60″)

The Chinese ‘’Dust Bowl’’

Benoit Aquin has been travelling the world for over twenty five years to transform the image into a poignant witness of the often conflictual relationship between humans and the land. Guided by a masterful balance, his work combines some features of documentary photography with those of contemporary art photography. He plays on this tension and the fuzzy boundary between disciplines and formal languages in order to highlight phenomena that are linked to ecological and humanitarian crises, thus placing the series he creates within the tradition of socially engaged photography.

In this series, the success of Aquin’s photography approach is rooted as much in the pertinence of his environmental discourse as in its aesthetic originality. His strong visual signature is characterized by a mysterious golden luminosity, which is both unsettling and mesmerizing. The artist turns his camera away from one-dimensional, sensationalist images to instead favour quilted, complex and decentred compositions that simultaneously display the multiple forces and energies in play: the effect of China’s immense food needs on the agricultural lands, a destabilized nature that is unleashed in sandstorms, the migration of rural populations towards the cities, the austere strategies of communist city planning.

The series The Chinese “Dust Bowl” received the National Magazine Award Silver Medal for Photojournalism and Photo Essays as well as the prestigious Prix Pictet. Benoit Aquin was also the recipient of the Prix Antoine-Desilets (2006), the Canadian National Newspaper Award (2007) and the Grand Prix Lux (2007).

Benoit Aquin Tempête à Hongsibao, Chine (série Le Dust Bowl chinois), 2007 Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 5 : 81 x 122 cm (32" x 48") Éd. 7 : 101 x 152 cm (40″ x 60″)

Benoit Aquin
Tempête à Hongsibao, Chine (série Le Dust Bowl chinois), 2007
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 5 : 81 x 122 cm (32″ x 48″)
Éd. 7 : 101 x 152 cm (40″ x 60″)

Benoit Aquin’s Biography

Since 1998, after his studies at the New England School of Photography in Boston, Benoit Aquin has participated in several solo and group exhibitions in Canada, the US, France, Switzerland, Holland, Spain, Greece, Germany, China, UK, Russia and the United Arab Emirates. Among his exhibitions let us highlight the ones at the Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography (1994); Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (1996); Palais de Tokyo, Paris (2008); Musée de l’Élisée, Lausanne (2010); Museum of Photographic Arts, Sans Diego (2011); McCord Museum, Montréal (2013); Somerset House, London (2013); Montréal Museum of Fine Arts (2013 and 2015); FotoDock, Holland (2014); Mouravieff-Apostol House & Museum (2016); as well as his participation in Mois de la Photo à Montréal (1993, 1997, 2003); the Canadian Biennial of the National Gallery of Canada (2012, 2017); and the Rencontres d’Arles in France (1991, 2014). His works have been reproduced in many magazines throughout the world, among which Time Magazine, Canadian Geographic, The Guardian, Foto8, Canadian Art, Walrus Magazine, L’actualité and Art Forum. He has also participated in the publishing of over a dozen press stories, monographs or photographic essays in order to share his environmental and humanitarian concerns with a broad public.

Benoit Aquin Camion en feu (Le Dust Bowl chinois), 2006 Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 7 : 81 x 122 cm (32" x 48") Éd. 5 : 101 x 152 cm (40″ x 60″)

Benoit Aquin
Camion en feu (Le Dust Bowl chinois), 2006
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 7 : 81 x 122 cm (32″ x 48″)
Éd. 5 : 101 x 152 cm (40″ x 60″)

Benoit Aquin’s works are part of the collections, among others, of the Montréal Museum of Fine Arts; Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec; Canadian Museum of Contemporary Photography; Canada Council Art Bank; Banque Pictet, Geneva; Mouvement Desjardins; Banque Nationale; Caisse de Dépôt; Hydro-Québec; One Drop Foundation; Library of Congress, Washington D.C.; and the François Pinault collection. Benoit Aquin is represented by Galerie Hugues Charbonneau.

Benoit Aquin, 10e anniversaire du Dust Bowl chinois [exposition_exhibition] 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Benoit Aquin, 10e anniversaire du Dust Bowl chinois [exposition_exhibition]
2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Benoit Aquin, 10e anniversaire du Dust Bowl chinois [exposition_exhibition] 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Benoit Aquin, 10e anniversaire du Dust Bowl chinois [exposition_exhibition]
2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Jean-Benoit Pouliot — Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images

March 10th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Lunettes superposantes, 2016 Lunettes modifiées et miroirs Modified glasses and mirror

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Lunettes superposantes, 2016
Lunettes modifiées et miroirs
Modified glasses and mirror

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present a new exhibition by Jean-Benoit Pouliot in which he adopts a conceptual and reflexive approach to the painting object. The different states of this exploration variously take shape in photography, painting and in installation or sculpture.

Tilt and Shift: Flexible Images is a project that investigates the image/object relationship through an active reflection on the contemporary conditions of the image’s appearance, transformation and distribution. Jean-Benoit Pouliot takes his own production of abstract paintings as a staring point to release the images that are inherent in them; these images will consequently be free, flexible and will continue to follow their course independently of their primary support. Does the image keep on moving beyond the point where the painting ends? If yes, in what shapes? In what spaces?

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Glissement découpé 1, 2015 Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra 36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Glissement découpé 1, 2015
Impression jet d’encre sur papier glacé opaque, monté sous plexi sans reflet, sur sintra
Ink jet print on glossy opaque paper, mounted under plexi without reflexion, on sintra
36 x 32 cm (14’’ x 12 1/2’’)

Nowadays the image can be easily detached from its primary physical reality: it can move, appear and disappear on command depending on the digital vessel that is conveying it. Jean-Benoit Pouliot has sought to contain this new image ubiquity by personally directing several second lives of his paintings along hypothetical paths.The interventions he carries out deeply probe the physical relation that the painting intrinsically sets up between the image and the object. In the gallery space this process triggers a play of echoes between the canvasses and their photographic, textual and sculptural iterations. The paintings were digitized, stretched, cut up, photocopied, put under the microscope or described in words. This approach on several fronts enables the artist to foreground the limits and impacts of digital media in our relationship to the image. Jean-Benoit Pouliot stages his paintings and by the same token, he reframes the way in which we behold them. In reflecting the image by way of the painting, he proposes to take the time to “re-view” the painting by way of the image.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Sans-titre, 2017 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Sans-titre, 2017
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
35,5 x 27,9 cm (14” x 11”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot

Jean-Benoit Pouliot (b. 1975) is a self-taught artist who began his career in the early 2000s through the medium of printmaking. Painting gained a central place in his practice in 2008, and since then, Pouliot has participated in several solo and group exhibitions in Canada and the United-States. He has also participated in Nuit Blanche Toronto (2016), the public art happening Aires libres in Montréal (2014), the Extreme Painting event in Montréal (2013 and 2010), as well as the Multi Month 10 in Québec City (2009). His works are in numerous private and institutional collections, such as the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Loto-Québec, National Bank, Bank of Montreal, TD Bank, Mouvement Desjardins, and the collection of the Cirque du Soleil, among others.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L'image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot, L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons [exposition_exhibition], 2017, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Spaces for Agency — Recomposer la ville

January 12th, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Isabelle Hayeur

Maria Hupfield

David Lafrance

Alain Paiement

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017 Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement Vue d'exposition Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017
Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement
Vue d’exposition
Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017 Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement Vue d'exposition Installation view

Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency, 2017
Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement
Vue d’exposition
Installation view

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to launch the year 2017 with a group show bringing together Isabelle Hayeur, Maria Hupfield, David Lafrance and Alain Paiement. Recomposer la ville / Spaces for Agency sets out to question notions of the “public” and “collective” in urban space. The exhibition is an invitation to reflect in a critical and different perspective on the celebrations being held as part of Montreal’s 375th anniversary.

Isabelle Hayeur Day Trading (série Nuits américaines), 2006 Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur aluminium avec traitement UV Ink jet prin on polyester mounted on aluminium with UV traitement Édition 5/5 109 x 165 cm (43

Isabelle Hayeur
Day Trading (série Nuits américaines), 2006
Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur aluminium avec traitement UV
Ink jet prin on polyester mounted on aluminium with UV traitement
Édition 5/5
109 x 165 cm (43″ x 65″)

Isabelle Hayeur, Pulse, 2015 Vidéo HD, couleur, stéréo Video, HD, color, stereo Édition 3 3 minutes

Isabelle Hayeur,
Pulse, 2015
Vidéo HD, couleur, stéréo
Video, HD, color, stereo
Édition 3
3 minutes

While not exclusive to our city, the questions we raise touch on: inhabiting city space and urban territory; established authorities; citizen resistance and engagement strategies; issues of peaceful coexistence — or its possibility in certain current political contexts. The works are presented along two mainlines in which, on one hand, the artists reimagine the topography of the city, and on the other, they explore ways of culturally and socially re-appropriating one’s environment. These mainlines which overlap in the gallery perhaps make it possible to glimpse the political potential that the works and places of art can signify in their immediate communities.

Maria Hupfield Survival and Other Acts of Defiance, 2011 Installation video et ruban adhésif en aluminium au sol en forme de

Maria Hupfield
Survival and Other Acts of Defiance, 2011
Installation video et ruban adhésif en aluminium au sol en forme de “X”
Video installation with silver “X” on floor made of aluminium tape
Édition 3
2,4 x 1,2 x 1,2 x m (8’ x 4’ x 4’)

Isabelle Hayeuris proposing two composite works. The photograph Day Trading (2006) shows the construction site of a building with an ambiguous function, which is in fact artificial because it is entirely the result of a digital manipulation. The video Pulse (2015), which is inspired by the student strike of the spring of 2015 in Montreal and the social struggles surrounding it, brings together a myriad of images found or filmed by the artist, who herewith denounces neoliberal austerity measures and erosion of political liberties. For her part, Maria Hupfield presents the video Survival and Other Acts of Defiance (2011) in which she is shown jumping on the spot, in a loop, and thus infinitely. Reinforced by the sound of tin jingles worn on her boots, she strongly affirms her presence as an indigenous woman who is constantly (re)negotiating her environment. On the floor, a large metallic X invites visitors to join in with her.

David Lafrance Place publique 1, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint 13 x 20 x 23 cm (5’’x 8’’ x 9’’)

David Lafrance
Place publique 1, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
13 x 20 x 23 cm (5’’x 8’’ x 9’’)

David Lafrance Place publique 4, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint  15 x 20 x 33 cm (6’’x 8’’ x 13’’)

David Lafrance
Place publique 4, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
15 x 20 x 33 cm (6’’x 8’’ x 13’’)

David Lafrance is presenting sculptures in multi-coloured wood that form part of the series Places publiques (2016). These imaginary city planning projects suggest a grandness and a dazzle that are paradoxically troubled by drab splashes or the affixing of disproportionate botanical sketches on their surface. Finally, Alain Paiement brings us a new large-scale photographic work,Voisinage contextuel (2016), in which he disregards the functional side of the Montreal city map and reduces the macro to the micro. He suspends the practical relationship to city space to instead recompose it in dialogue with the humans who collectively inhabit and animate it on a daily basis.

Alain Paiement Voisinage contextuel, 2016 Impression numérique sur papier coton archive Digital print on archival cotton paper Image : 142 x 213 cm (55,9” x 83,9”)  Papier_paper : 152 x 223 cm (60” x 88”)

Alain Paiement
Voisinage contextuel, 2016
Impression numérique sur papier coton archive
Digital print on archival cotton paper
Image : 142 x 213 cm (55,9” x 83,9”)
Papier_paper : 152 x 223 cm (60” x 88”)

Karen Tam — Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations

November 4th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations 2016 Vue d'exposition  Installation view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal, Canada

Karen Tam
Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations
2016
Vue d’exposition
Installation view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal, Canada

The artist’s second solo exhibition at the gallery, but the first to be exclusively made up of original works – Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is delighted to present this new installation by Karen Tam. The artist is continuing her research on the reproduction of antiquities and the commodification of Chinese culture by focusing on the imaging of cultures through their contacts and stereotypes.

Karen Tam Galloping Silk Road Blood-Sweating Horse No. 1, 2016 Techniques mixtes Mixed media 47.5 x 122 x 39.5 cm (18 3/4”x 48”x 15 1/2”)

Karen Tam
Galloping Silk Road Blood-Sweating Horse No. 1, 2016
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
47.5 x 122 x 39.5 cm (18 3/4”x 48”x 15 1/2”)

The exhibition Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations comprises a group of sculptures that borrows its technique from Mexican piñata making as well as a series of works on cyanotype paper running along the walls where they evoke blue and white Chinese ceramics. This sequence reproduces the constellations of sky maps from the Dunhuang caves (c. 650-680) that are thought to be the first graphic representation of the stars in Chinese astronomy. These various drawings apparently served, among other things, as a navigational tool for merchant caravans travelling along the Silk Road towards the West. The horse and camel-shaped piñatas, placed on the floor or suspended, are for their part intended to complicate the festive tradition of the Mexican piñata. Karen Tam juxtaposes the latter with the Chinese tradition of papier-mâché funerary offerings as well as the funerary ceramics depicting horses and camels in the Tang Dynasty (c. 600-900). Moreover, Karen Tam draws inspiration from some sources tracing the piñata’s origin back to China from where it was supposedly exported to Italy by Marco Polo then moved on to Spain, and from there to their colony: Mexico. Together, these fake ceramic tiles and papier-mâché transportation animals stimulate reflection on the intercultural impacts brought about by the Silk Road and its modernization, announced in 2015 by the Chinese department of Commerce.

Karen Tam Dunhuang Constellations, Map 8, 2016 Cyanotype sur papier de qualité archives 100% naturel Cyanotype on archival 100% natural fibre paper 8 feuilles_sheets Total : 27,5 x 284 cm (11” x 112”)

Karen Tam
Dunhuang Constellations, Map 8, 2016
Cyanotype sur papier de qualité archives 100% naturel
Cyanotype on archival 100% natural fibre paper
8 feuilles_sheets
Total : 27,5 x 284 cm (11” x 112”)

The current exhibition coincides with the opening, on November 23, 2016, of a solo show dedicated to Karen Tam at the Musée d’art contemporain des Laurentides, where the artist will begin an evolving project studying the Jesuit influence on the perception and dissemination of Chinese culture in Quebec from 1920-1930. The project will continue to unfold at Expression – Centre d’exposition de Saint-Hyacinthe (2017) and at Musée régional de Rimouski (2018), as well as through a publication.

Karen Tam Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations 2016 Vue d'exposition  Installation view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal, Canada (photo Guy L'Heureux)

Karen Tam
Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations
2016
Vue d’exposition
Installation view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal, Canada
(photo Guy L’Heureux)

Karen Tam

Karen Tam (b. 1977) holds a MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a PhD from the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. Since the 2000s, her work has been steadily exhibited: Musée d’art contemporain des Laurentides, Saint-Jérôme (2016); The Drawing Center, New York (2014); The Mendel/Remai Art Gallery of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (2014); The Victoria & Albert Museum, London (2012, 2011); Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, Montreal (2010, 2008); Irish Museum of Modern Art, Dublin (2010, 2005, 2004); Art Gallery of Greater Victoria, Victoria (2007). In 2016, she was nominated for the Prix en art actuel awarded by the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec and was on the long list for the prestigious Sobey Art Award in 2016 and 2010. Her works are part of the collections of the Irish Museum of Modern Art, Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Caisse de dépôt et placement du Québec, Royal Bank of Canada, TD Group, Hydro-Québec and the Canada Council Art Bank, to name but these. She lives and works in Montreal.

Karen Tam Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations 2016 Vue d'exposition  Installation view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal, Canada

Karen Tam
Silk Road: Storm-Detectors, Blood-Sweating Horses, and Constellations
2016
Vue d’exposition
Installation view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montreal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur: Desert Shores (Lost America)

July 30th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Isabelle Hayeur Looking-back (série Desert Shores), 2015 Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur Dibond Inkjet print on polyester mounted on Dibond Edition 3 Image : 61 x 91 cm (24” x 36”) Papier_Paper : 76 x 106,5 cm (30” x 42”)

Isabelle Hayeur
Looking-back (série Desert Shores), 2015
Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur Dibond
Inkjet print on polyester mounted on Dibond
Edition 3
Image : 61 x 91 cm (24” x 36”)
Papier_Paper : 76 x 106,5 cm (30” x 42”)

To launch the 2016-2017 season, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to present its first solo exhibition by Isabelle Hayeur. She will be presenting Desert Shores (Lost America) (2015-2016), a new series documenting the polluted and deserted region of Salton Sea, in the United States. Hayeur has selected five photographs from this vast body of work, as well as a 35-minute video and an album of 60 other photos from the series for on-site consultation.

Salton Sea is a large salt lake located on the San Andreas Fault, in an arid depression in South-western California, 227 feet below sea level. It was accidentally created at the beginning of the last century when the Colorado River overflowed its banks and was contained. In the 1950s and 1960s, it became a very popular attraction, and a paradise for fishing aficionados. Its shores were dotted with numerous hotels, marinas, and yacht clubs. Named Desert Shores, the area underwent significant economic and population growth at this time.

Isabelle Hayeur Marea Roja (série Desert Shores), 2015-2016 Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur Dibond Inkjet print on polyester mounted on Dibond Edition 3 Image : 61 x 91 cm (24” x 36”) Papier_Paper : 76 x 106,5 cm (30” x 42”)

Isabelle Hayeur
Marea Roja (série Desert Shores), 2015-2016
Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur Dibond
Inkjet print on polyester mounted on Dibond
Edition 3
Image : 61 x 91 cm (24” x 36”)
Papier_Paper : 76 x 106,5 cm (30” x 42”)

Towards the 1970s, it was observed that the lake’s water level was dropping and its salinity rising, in direct relationship with the augmentation of agricultural activity in the surrounding area. Today, this area is deserted and desolate, alluvial deposits saturated with fertilizers and pesticides pollute the water, and algae blooms are decimating fish stocks. Beachside resorts have given way to trailer parks, homes for the poor, the marginalized and Mexican immigrants – a different and less than shining portrait of the United States. For Hayeur, this disenchanted landscape is a mirror image of a lost America, from an era in which everything seemed possible and accessible for all citizens. This area of dire poverty is not unlike others, found all across the United States, a Third World of their own where the most destitute remain, for lack of a better alternative. The works in Desert Shores (Lost America) are fragments of dystopian landscape, modern ruins, dilapidated and graffiti-covered domestic spaces, dried-up fish carcasses and disturbingly coloured bodies of water, summing up a wasteland of human failure at nature’s expense.

Isabelle Hayeur Exposure (série Desert Shores), 2015-2016 Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur Dibond Inkjet print on polyester mounted on Dibond Edition 3 Image : 61 x 91 cm (24” x 36”) Papier_Paper : 76 x 106,5 cm (30” x 42”)

Isabelle Hayeur
Exposure (série Desert Shores), 2015-2016
Jet d’encre sur papier polyester, monté sur Dibond
Inkjet print on polyester mounted on Dibond
Edition 3
Image : 61 x 91 cm (24” x 36”)
Papier_Paper : 76 x 106,5 cm (30” x 42”)

Isabelle Hayeur   

Isabelle Hayeur’s work has been widely shown in many major shows, such as at the Ryerson Image Centre (Toronto) (2016);theMuseo Cultural (Santa Fe) (2016);theToday Art Museum (Beijing) (2015); the New Orleans Museum of Art(2015); the Centre culturel canadien (Paris) (2012); the Akbank Sanat (Istanbul) (2008); the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (2007); the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2006); the Neuer Berliner Kunstverein (Berlin) (2005); the Casino Luxembourg Forum d’art contemporain (2005); and the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Arts (2004). Her works are to be found in over twenty collections, including those of the National Gallery of Canada, the Fonds national d’art contemporain in Paris, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Vancouver Art Gallery, theCanadian Museum of Contemporary Photography, the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the New Orleans Museum of Art and the Museum of Contemporary Photography in Chicago.

Isabelle Hayeur Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016 Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur
Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016 Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur
Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016 Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur
Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016 Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Isabelle Hayeur
Desert Shores [exposition_exhibition], 2016
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

A Comfortable Indifference: Benoit Aquin, Cynthia Girard-Renard, Isabelle Hayeur et David Lafrance

June 1st, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Benoit Aquin Genghis Khan, Mongolie (série Le Dust Bowl chinois) Genghis Khan, Mongolia (The Chinese Dust Bowl), 2006 Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 5 : 61 x 91 cm (24

Benoit Aquin
Genghis Khan, Mongolie (série Le Dust Bowl chinois)
Genghis Khan, Mongolia (The Chinese Dust Bowl), 2006
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 5 : 61 x 91 cm (24″ x 36”)
Éd. 7 : 81 x 122 cm (32″ x 48″)

A Comfortable Indifference 

For its summer exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau presents a selection of works that highlight the challenging conciliation between the capitalist system and the environmental movement.

Clearly, time is running out while the acceleration of global warming endangers human populations, threatens biodiversity and causes extreme weather events. Denial is no longer an option. And yet, the unrestrained quest for economic growth and our current dependence on fossil fuels compromises our efforts to limit the increase in global temperatures and the decarbonisation of the economy. A shift toward united and sustainable principles must be taken on a global, local and individual level.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Décroissance/ Degrowth, 2014 Acrylique sur mousseline de coton Acrylic on muslin  397 x 300 cm (156 1/4

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Décroissance/ Degrowth, 2014
Acrylique sur mousseline de coton
Acrylic on muslin
397 x 300 cm (156 1/4″ x 118″)
(Photo : Guy L’Heureux)

In the gallery, Benoit Aquin invites us to confront two human-made environmental disasters. First, his celebrated project, The Chinese “Dust Bowl” (2006-2009), portrays the desertification of the former Silk Road in Inner Mongolia, while his series, Mégantic (2013), documents the worst land-based oil spill to date in North America – now emblematic of the careless management surrounding the hydrocarbon lobby. For her part, Cynthia Girard-Renard presents a large painting from her project Unicorns and Dictators (2014), first exhibited at the Esker Foundation in Calgary. The work features a hybrid character reminiscent of a trickster, with smoke-belching factories for ears. He is surrounded by anxious rabbits inquiring about the future, while greenish clouds inscribed with words like, ‘NATURE’, ‘PROFIT’, and ‘CAPITAL’, drift overhead.

Isabelle Hayeur Écume d'étang (série Underworld), 2015 Édition 5 127 x 91 cm (50

Isabelle Hayeur
Écume d’étang (série Underworld), 2015
Édition 5
127 x 91 cm (50″ x 36″)

Isabelle Hayeur takes us elsewhere entirely – underwater – with her multi-year project Underworlds (2008-2015), documenting aquatic scenes of completely impaired ecosystems. This unusual vantage point effectively portrays the degradation of various bodies of water through urbanisation and massive industrialisation. Finally, David Lafrance’s series titled Earthships (2015), depicts the self-sustaining dwellings of the same name, juxtaposing these with miniature bucolic scenes and schematic or abstract interpretations of the homes’ energy efficient systems. Lafrance invites us to reflect on this fantasized green paradise, which sits diametrically opposed to our hyper-consumption and our technological dependence.

David Lafrance Earthship 07, 2015 Huile sur panneau Oil on panel 15 x 20 cm (6

David Lafrance
Earthship 07, 2015
Huile sur panneau
Oil on panel
15 x 20 cm (6″ x 8″)

The title of this exhibition was inspired by Josée Blanchette’s article “La confortable inconscience”, published in Le Devoir on February 26, 2016.

Julie Trudel: Bone Black and Titanium White — Transparency and distortion

April 6th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to present Julie Trudel’s second solo exhibition, featuring the latest development in her work with the materiality of colour. This series of approximately 10 three-dimensional paintings was created in 2015 during various artist residencies, and was presented in part at the Anna Leonowens Gallery at NSCAD University last fall.

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

With Bone Black and Titanium White—Transparency and Distortion, Julie Trudel continues to work with the self-imposed chromatic constraint she adopted in 2012, namely the use of pure black and white pigments which she simply dilutes in large amounts of clear acrylic medium. This time, however, she has innovated her approach by adding clear acrylic supports (also known as Plexiglas). Technical considerations at the end of 2014 led her to choose this material as a way to explore its material properties – transparency, reflection, reversibility and plasticity – in conjunction with her fascination for the translucence and opacity of paint. While experimenting with various types of plastics, light emerged as a central component and the paintings were subsequently pulled out from the wall to better enable the interplay of light and surface.

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion BNNN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion BNNN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

Each piece is created on a very thin sheet of Plexiglas painted on one side before being bent into three sections through thermoforming. Two sections are painted in flat black tints, giving them a mirror-like quality, or in white, which reflects light. The third section is clear and covered in a pattern of translucent dots that seem to break away from the surface, producing the illusion of movement and depth. The folding of the two panels on either side of the central one produces a complex interplay of reflections between the three sections, while the concave shape it creates captures light and multiplies the effect of transparency or distortion within the cluster of dots. Trudel’s choice of Plexiglas has evidently deepened her research into the materiality of colour and light, thereby opening new possibilities within the pictorial field. Moreover, their presentation in the gallery allows viewers to experience the near-sculptural nature of her paintings as they extend into the exhibition space, and to witness how dramatically their appearance shifts depending on the angle of view.

Julie Trudel Noir d'ivoire et blanc de titane -- transparence et distorsion, 2016 Vue d'exposition Exhibition view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel
Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane — transparence et distorsion, 2016
Vue d’exposition
Exhibition view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel

Over the past five years, her work has been presented in France, in Germany, Japan, United-States, and throughout Canada. Trudel was a two-time finalist in the RBC Canadian Painting Competition (2011, 2012), and winner of the Joseph Plaskett Award in painting (2013). Her work is included in several collections, including the Collection Prêt d’œuvres d’art of the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec; the Ville de Montréal; RBC Bank and TD Bank. She lives and works in Montréal.

The artist would like to warmly thank the Joseph Plaskett Foundation, the Triangle Arts Association, NSCAD University and the Robert Pope Foundation, who supported the development of this new project. She would also like to acknowledge the contribution of her skilful and reliable studio assistants, Katie Lesser and Arkadi Lavoie Lachapelle, as well as Donald Thompson, Martin Schop and Atelier Clark, who helped resolve many technical challenges.

Julie Trudel Noir d'ivoire et blanc de titane -- transparence et distorsion, 2016 Vue d'exposition Exhibition view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel
Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane — transparence et distorsion, 2016
Vue d’exposition
Exhibition view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Cynthia Girard-Renard: La revanche des Sans-culottes

February 18th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

La revanche des Sans-culottes

For her first solo exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Cynthia Girard-Renard proposes a body of work created during the CALQ residency in Paris in 2015 and presented last fall in Porto, Portugal, under the title Les Sans-culottes. For the present exhibition, the series has been enlarged to include several new works, and already-existing puppets, banners and paintings have been complexified and reused. Girard-Renard’s starting point is the French Revolution, from which she develops a critical reflection on revolutionary thought in our current context of neoliberal austerity.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015 Acrylique sur toile libre de coton Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas 224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015
Acrylique sur toile libre de coton
Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas
224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

La revanche des Sans-culottes borrows its irreverent and comical energy from the caricatural social satire genre in 18th century France, an important influence for Girard-Renard during the development of the project. The title of the exhibition refers to the derogatory moniker applied to working-class protesters, that wore trousers or striped skirts, rather than the “culotte”, knickers favored by the Ancien Régime aristocracy. Girard-Renard stages confrontations between the monarchy and the people through an array of works depicting the decadence of Marie-Antoinette and Louis XVI’s court, which she compares to the voracity of today’s oligarchs and millionaires. The luxury industry, fashion, and finance collide with the threat of debt in Greece and the ubiquitous austerity that clobbers us in Québec, Europe and elsewhere – not unlike Punch’s beating-stick.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016 Techniques mixtes Mixed media 240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

In the gallery space, Le petit théâtre du grand capital (2016) depicts this confrontation between the 99% and the elusive and shapeshifting 1%. Puppets and papier mâché props adopt the burlesque and ribald codes of the Théâtre du Grand-Guignol, active in Paris from 1896 to 1963. For its part, the theatrical curtain of Sous les pavés, la plage (2015), a reference to the famous May 1968 slogan, acts as a bridge between the exhibition and 1789, invoking past revolutionary ardor and defiantly taking a stand against mediocrity’s dominion.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Les Sans-culottes, 2015 Papier, bois et corde Paper, wood and rope 167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Les Sans-culottes, 2015
Papier, bois et corde
Paper, wood and rope
167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard

For more than 20 years, Girard-Renard has been actively exhibiting in Canada and internationally, including: Esker Foundation, Calgary (2014); Thousand Plateaus Art Space, Chengdu, China (2011); Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina (2010); Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (2010); September Gallery, Berlin (2009); Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2009); SPACE, London (2006), not to mention her solo exhibition, Fictions sylvestres, at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2005) and her participation in the 2008 Quebec Triennial. Girard-Renard’s work is found in the collections of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Carleton University Art Gallery, the UQAM Gallery, as well as many private collections. The artist lives and works in Montréal.

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

David Lafrance: Les Appelants

January 6th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Vernissage: January 16th from 3 to 6 PM. The artist will be present.

David Lafrance Palette de peintre, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint  40,5 x 86 x 30,5 cm (16’’x 34’’ x 12’’)

David Lafrance
Palette de peintre, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
40,5 x 86 x 30,5 cm (16’’x 34’’ x 12’’)

Les appelants

David Lafrance opens our 2016 season at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau with an exhibition of polychrome wood sculptures. This body of work marks Lafrance’s renewed approach to working with three-dimensional objects and their painted surfaces which activate key concepts in his artistic practice: memory, popular culture and desire.

Les appelants refers to artificial lures, traditionally crafted out of wood and used by hunters to attract wild birds. These decoys act as catalysts; their mere presence is enough to attract other birds. Lafrance’s interest in this concept can be linked to his previous painting series, namely Clubs, Video Poker and Ventilateurs, where places and effigies give tangible form to today’s incessant quest for pleasure and (over)consumption.

The exhibition Les appelants brings together sculptures whose forms are hewn, then assembled and painted. They refer in a grotesque way to objects either found in the artist’s studio, or that relate to current events. The works seamlessly combine rough textures with graceful curves that reinvent, even re-enchant, the everyday. Moving through this colourful collection in the gallery, our desires are given form, and our hopes for the future, our anxieties and our vices, are laid bare. These are allegories, hyphens between our selves and the exterior world; these objects draw us in, as if possessed by certain truths or clues to our relationship with the world, like sirens who both seduce us and warn us of imminent danger.

David Lafrance Meditéranée, 2015-2016 Bois et peinture acrylique Wood and acrylic paint  61 x 48 x 35,5 cm (24’’x 19’’ x 14’’)

David Lafrance
Meditéranée, 2015-2016
Bois et peinture acrylique
Wood and acrylic paint
61 x 48 x 35,5 cm (24’’x 19’’ x 14’’)

David Lafrance

For nearly 15 years, David Lafrance’s (b. 1976) work has been presented in numerous exhibitions and biennales in Canada, the US, and in France. Among his recent solo exhibitions are Ceaac (2015), Strasbourg; Galerie Hugues Charbonneau (2014); L’Œil de Poisson (2014), Québec City; and the Musée régional de Rimouski (2012), which won the prize for “Best exhibition outside of Montréal” at the AGAC’s Gala des arts visuels. His works are part of several private and public collections, including the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec (CPOA), the Bibliothèque nationale du Québec; the Leonard and Bina Ellen Art Gallery, Montréal; Lotto Québec; Hydro-Québec; and Movement Desjardins. He lives and works in Montréal.

David Lafrance, Les appelants (exposition_exhibition), 2016, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

David Lafrance, Les appelants (exposition_exhibition), 2016, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Maria Hupfield: Stay Golden

October 6th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Vernissage: October 10 from 3 to 5pm. The artist will be present.

Stay Golden

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to welcome Maria Hupfield for her second solo exhibition at the gallery. Based on her performance titled Jiimaan, which took place in Venice in May 2015, Stay Golden presents a new collection of gold sculptures, a life-size grey felt canoe, and a two-channel video.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.

Maria Hupfield’s installations, much like her performances, employ various strategies for occupying space. The artist is interested in how the charged identity of sites can impact our behaviour, but also how they can define our identity or change our perception of things. How do we appropriate a new place for ourselves? How do we activate the places that surround us? Can these be a source of empowerment or of communion with the past?

Maria Hupfield Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015 Grelots en étain avec fini doré  et élasthanne doré avec polyfil   Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil 43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Maria Hupfield
Victory in Defeat (working title), 2015
Grelots en étain avec fini doré et élasthanne doré avec polyfil
Spandex fabric, tin jingles with gold color finish and polyfil
43 x 30,5 x 43 cm (17’’ x 12 ‘’ x 17”)

Similarly, material culture and the symbolic or emotional value we imbue certain objects with, is at the core of her research. In the gallery, public memory is superimposed on the artist’s own, through objects in her Trophy Wall, an assemblage of grey felt or gold fabric sculptures; relics and artefacts of one or many previous performances. This commemorative wall suggests both a celebration and a laying to rest of these now “museum-ified” objects.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015 Installation video à deux canaux Two channel video installation  Édition : 3 1:15:00 boucle _ loop Camera Dylan McLaughlin Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe, Video), 2015
Installation video à deux canaux
Two channel video installation
Édition : 3
1:15:00 boucle _ loop
Camera Dylan McLaughlin
Montage_Editing Dylan McLaughlin

Hupfield’s hand-made nine-foot canoe is the central element of the Jiimaan performance, which the artist enacted as part of the Ga ni tha exhibition in the Campo dei Gesuiti in Venice. An eponymous two-channel video retraces the different stages of this intervention: over three consecutive days, Hupfield performed before the public each evening, then recreated the previous night’s performance the following morning, alone and from memory.

Maria Hupfield Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015 Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.  Felt canoe,  ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap. 274 cm long (9’ long)

Maria Hupfield
Jiimaan (Canoe), 2015
Canoe en feutre, ruban, sac et accrochage, avec motif d’eau sur bande orange et sur bâche bleu.
Felt canoe, ribbon, bag. hanging and water pattern in orange tape on blue trap.
274 cm long (9’ long)

This piece reveals key concepts in the artist’s work, namely proficiency, cultural memory, and the body’s presence. She proposes a meeting between nations and their history through the Canadian and Anishinaabe traditions of birch bark canoe building, paralleling this with the fabrication of gondolas by Venetian artisans. Moreover, the participatory nature of Jiimaan’s public performances makes direct reference to Anishinaabe oral traditions and Hupfield’s desire to create memories through shared human experience.

Maria Hupfield Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015 Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe. 30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield
Venice Fringe Gloves, 2015
Gants de soirée en soie blanche et dorée avec frange de 2 pieds et frange vénitienne dorée de 4 pieds
White satin and gold colored evening gloves with 2’ fringe and 4’ venetian gold colored fringe.
30,5 x 13 x 2,5 cm (12’’ x 4’’ x 1’’)

Maria Hupfield

Maria Hupfield’s work extends through performance, installation, sculpture, video, photography, and collage. Over the past ten years, numerous institutions throughout Canada, the US, and Europe have presented her work and performances in solo and group exhibitions, namely the North American Native Museum, Zurich (2014), the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2014), the Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian, Washington D.C. (2013), the National Gallery of Canada (2013), the Museum of Art and Design, New York (2012), the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, Santa Fe (2011), and the McCord Museum, Montréal (2011). Maria Hupfield is a Canadian artist of Anishinaabe (Ojibway) heritage, and a member of the Wasauksing First Nation in Ontario. She lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

L’image signée – L’image signée – Benoit Aquin, Alain Paiement, Jonathan Plante, Chloe Lum & Yannick Desranleau (Séripop)

August 27th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening cocktail: September 12, from 3 to 5pm with the artists in attendance

Benoit Aquin Coq  No 5 (série L’agriculture au Québec), Rooster No 5 (Agriculture in Québec) 2014 Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive Archival digital pigment print Édition 5 : 81 x 122 cm (32

Benoit Aquin
Coq No 5 (série L’agriculture au Québec), Rooster No 5 (Agriculture in Québec)
2014
Impression numérique à pigments de qualité archive
Archival digital pigment print
Édition 5 : 81 x 122 cm (32″ x 48″)
Édition 5 : 101 x 152 cm (40″ x 60″)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau starts up the new season with an exhibition responding to the theme of the 2015 edition of le Mois de la Photo à Montréal, post-photography. L’image signée brings together Benoit Aquin, Alain Paiement, Jonathan Plante and Seripop (Chloe Lum & Yannick Desranleau) in an exhibition where each work asserts, in its own way, both the important role of the author and his or her presence in the image.

Alain Paiement, Pluriels, 2015 Impression jet d’encre sur polyester Ink jet prin on polyester 248 x 312 cm (98 ‘’ x 123 3/4 ‘’)

Alain Paiement, Pluriels, 2015
Impression jet d’encre sur polyester
Ink jet prin on polyester 248 x 312 cm (98 ‘’ x 123 3/4 ‘’)

Post-photography describes a situation in contemporary photography that is characterized by a heightened accessibility to new technologies and the ubiquity of networked image-sharing applications and web platforms. Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, Twitter, etc. are tools for creation and dissemination that also overturn notions of originality and the integrity of the photograph in contemporary art. Le Mois de la Photo has chosen to present a selection of artists whose works have formed the aesthetic canon that these new tools seem to have given birth to.

Jonathan Plante, Microcinéma, 2015 Peinture acrylique sur  feuilles lenticulaires Acrylic paint on lenticular sheets 244 x 366 cm (96

Jonathan Plante, Microcinéma, 2015
Peinture acrylique sur feuilles lenticulaires
Acrylic paint on lenticular sheets
244 x 366 cm (96″ x 144″)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, however, invites the viewer to consider the question from a different angle, reversing post-photography’s erasure of the author and the subsequent danger for art itself. Instead, L’image signée brings together works that frame the artist’s hand and bear witness to the making and workmanship of the image. Each work questions the limits of photography and, in so doing, reaffirms its attachment to contemporary art, particularly in light of these recent developments in our relationship to images. Benoit Aquin spotlights his own presence through the use of powerful flash; Alain Paiement composes dizzying ensembles of spherical images; Jonathan Plante plays tricks on the viewer through the presentation of painted images in motion; and Seripop deconstructs the two-dimensionality of photography in sculpture.

Each of these artists puts his or her signature on an image that sincerely believes in its own uniqueness, undeterred by the current overabundance of photographic imagery.

Yannick Desranleau et Chloe Lum (SÉRIPOP), Big Sack I, 2015 Jet d’encre sur banière de vinyle, acier et techniques mixtes Inkjet on banner vinyl, steel, mixed media 228 x 294 x 76 cm (89 3/4 ‘’ x 115, 3/4 ‘’x 30 ‘’)

Yannick Desranleau et Chloe Lum (SÉRIPOP), Big Sack I, 2015
Jet d’encre sur banière de vinyle, acier et techniques mixtes
Inkjet on banner vinyl, steel, mixed media
228 x 294 x 76 cm (89 3/4 ‘’ x 115, 3/4 ‘’x 30 ‘’)

Views of the exhibition:

L'image signée (exposition_exhibition), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

L’image signée (exposition_exhibition), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

L'image signée (exposition_exhibition), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

L’image signée (exposition_exhibition), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

L'image signée (exposition_exhibition), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

L’image signée (exposition_exhibition), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada.

Écrans: Maryse Goudreau, Trevor Gould, Jean-Benoit Pouliot, Lucie Robert and Julie Trudel

June 26th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Maryse Goudreau Manifestation pour la mémoire des quais (détail) 2011 Négatif de verre au collodion humide numérisé, Impression jet d’encre, papier baryté Digitaslised collodion glass negative, inkjet print  Ed. 5 2 comp. : 100 cm x 80 cm ch. | ea.

Maryse Goudreau
Manifestation pour la mémoire des quais (détail)
2011
Négatif de verre au collodion humide numérisé, Impression jet d’encre, papier baryté
Digitaslised collodion glass negative, inkjet print
Ed. 5
2 comp. : 100 cm x 80 cm ch. | ea.

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau opens the summer season with a group exhibition bringing together the work of gallery artists, Trevor Gould, Jean-Benoit Pouliot and Julie Trudel, as well as invited artists Maryse Goudreau and Lucie Robert. The works exhibited in Écrans all explore the concept of ‘the screen,’whether it be through pictoral, historical, physical or political means.

Trevor Gould To be titled 2015 Aquarelle Watercolour 61 x 46 cm (24’’ x 18’’)

Trevor Gould
To be titled
2015
Aquarelle
Watercolour
61 x 46 cm (24’’ x 18’’)

Screens provide a paradox – they are simultaneously capable of being both revealing and concealing. This duality which constructs and conditions our gaze, expresses the inevitable incompleteness of the images that surround us as they evoke what is left out and what underwrites them. The screen then becomes an aesthetic, political and philosophical device, that allows us to analyze and understand the world we live in. It mobilizes ideas around interpretation or fractured narratives as it nourishes a broader understanding of our relationship with the immaterial, the fleeting.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot Glissement No3 2015 Impression jet d’encre sur film rétro éclairage hp montée sur aluminium Inkjet print on backlit hp film mounted on aluminium Ed. 2

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Glissement No3
2015
Impression jet d’encre sur film rétro éclairage hp montée sur aluminium
Inkjet print on backlit hp film mounted on aluminium
Ed. 2

A conduit for art straddling material and media, the screen can be understood as a physical or abstract support, but can also be seen as a historical and cultural construction, as a body-image norm-establishing weapon, as iconographic and conceptual foliation…Finally, the idea of the screen refers to a whole archeology of images and to a history of ideas.

Louise Robert Gestes noir sur blanc no.3 2014 Encre et fil cousu sur papier coton Ink and sewn wire on cotton paper  55 x 37 cm (21.5” x 14.5”)

Louise Robert
Gestes noir sur blanc no.3
2014
Encre et fil cousu sur papier coton
Ink and sewn wire on cotton paper
55 x 37 cm (21.5” x 14.5”)

Julie Trudel Chevauchements T123F123 2013 acrylique sur panneau acrylic on panel 19” x 24” (photo : Martin Désilets)

Julie Trudel
Chevauchements T123F123
2013
acrylique sur panneau
acrylic on panel
19” x 24”
(photo : Martin Désilets)

Julie Trudel Bifurcation NBN 2014 Gesso et acrylique sur MDF, marouflé sur contreplaqué  Gesso and acrylic on MDF mounted on plywood 60 x 74 cm (24” x 29”)

Julie Trudel
Bifurcation NBN
2014
Gesso et acrylique sur MDF, marouflé sur contreplaqué
Gesso and acrylic on MDF mounted on plywood
60 x 74 cm (24” x 29”)

Chloe Lum and Yannick Desranleau (SÉRIPOP): The Face Stayed East and the Mouth Went West (elements)

April 30th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Performance May 29 at 5:30pm > Choreography by Sarah Wendt > with Sarah Wendt, Katie Ewald + guest performers

Yannick Desranleau & Chloe Lum - SÉRIPOP The Face Stayed East The Mountain West (elements) 2014-2015 Impression UV sur boitier lumineux en acrylique, papier sérigraphié, tissu, vinyle renforcé UV prints on acrylic in lightboxes, screenprinted paper, fabric backed vinyl

Yannick Desranleau & Chloe Lum – SÉRIPOP
The Face Stayed East The Mountain West (elements) 2014-2015
Impression UV sur boitier lumineux en acrylique, papier sérigraphié, tissu, vinyle renforcé
UV prints on acrylic in lightboxes, screenprinted paper, fabric backed vinyl

The Face Stayed East and the Mouth Went West (elements)

Choreography by Sarah Wendt

with Sarah Wendt, Katie Ewald + guest performers

For their sophomore exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Séripop – the collaborative practice of Chloe Lum and Yannick Desranleau – will be exhibiting a new presentation of multi-disciplinary work. Known for their large scale sculptural installations constructed of brightly coloured – sometimes printed – paper materials, theThe Face Stayed East and the Mouth Went West (elements) exhibition distinguishes itself by referencing that sculptural work and its concepts through photo-based installation and performance.

In the last several years Séripop’s practice has explored the entropy of urban space. Their work occasionally engages directly with public architecture and objects (i.e. an entire building is papered and peels away over time in Avancez en arrière(2012)) and their sculptural installations are loosely reminiscent of the shapes and spaces that surround us in the public environment – buildings, construction sites, monuments – slowly shifting and collapsing with gravity and wear during the exhibition period.

At Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Séripop is exhibiting a series of large scale photographs, presented in light boxes, depicting existing sculptural works in repetition. Through these reproductions the objects are pushed to perform in new and different ways, against their own repeated selves and in the gallery space. Séripop then takes this dynamic a step further, collaborating for the first time with dancers to present a choreographed performance. Séripop’s misshapen objects are activated as props, costumes, and noise-makers, while being manipulated and navigated by the performers. As core members of the now defunct band AIDS Wolf, this overt performance work is new in form but not in nature for Séripop.

Yannick Desranleau & Chloe Lum - SÉRIPOP The Face Stayed East The Mountain West (elements) 2014-2015 Impression UV sur boitier lumineux en acrylique, papier sérigraphié, tissu, vinyle renforcé UV prints on acrylic in lightboxes, screenprinted paper, fabric backed vinyl

Yannick Desranleau & Chloe Lum – SÉRIPOP
The Face Stayed East The Mountain West (elements) 2014-2015
Impression UV sur boitier lumineux en acrylique, papier sérigraphié, tissu, vinyle renforcé
UV prints on acrylic in lightboxes, screenprinted paper, fabric backed vinyl

Séripop

Chloe Lum and Yannick Desranleau are based in Montréal. They have been the subject of several exhibitions in Canada and abroad, notably at the University of Texas at Austin (2015), the Center for Books and Paper Arts (Columbia College Chicago, 2015), Confederation Centre Art Gallery (Charlottetown, 2014), YYZ artists’ outlet (Toronto, 2013), the Blackwood Gallery

(University of Toronto, 2012), Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (Québec Triennial 2011),Kunsthalle Wien (Vienna, Austria, 2010), BALTIC Centre for Contemporary Art (Gateshead, England, 2009), and Whitechapel Project Space (London, England, 2007). Lum and Desranleau have also been active as musicians, touring internationally with the experimental rock band AIDS Wolf, and producing a series of award-winning concert posters under the moniker Séripop.

Their collaborative work is in several collections, notably the Victoria and Albert Museum (London), University of Maryland Art Gallery, and BMO. Séripop is currently long listed for the 2015 Sobey Art Award. Séripop is represented by Galerie Hugues Charbonneau in Montréal.

seripop.com

Yannick Desranleau & Chloe Lum - SÉRIPOP The Face Stayed East The Mountain West (elements) 2014-2015 Impression UV sur boitier lumineux en acrylique, papier sérigraphié, tissu, vinyle renforcé UV prints on acrylic in lightboxes, screenprinted paper, fabric backed vinyl

Yannick Desranleau & Chloe Lum – SÉRIPOP
The Face Stayed East The Mountain West (elements) 2014-2015
Impression UV sur boitier lumineux en acrylique, papier sérigraphié, tissu, vinyle renforcé
UV prints on acrylic in lightboxes, screenprinted paper, fabric backed vinyl

Alain Paiement: Instants, Maybe

February 24th, 2015 § 0 comments § permalink

Alain Paiement Fatras, 2015 Transfert sur aluminium Transfer on aluminium Éd. 2 296 x 383 cm (116 1/2” x 150 3/4”)

Alain Paiement
Fatras, 2015
Transfert sur aluminium
Transfer on aluminium
Éd. 2
296 x 383 cm (116 1/2” x 150 3/4”)

Vernissage: March 14, 3pm – 5pm with the artist present.

Instants, maybe

In the second phase of his 2014-2015 solo project at Gallery Hugues Charbonneau, Alain Paiement delves deep into the imposing photo bank that represents all the images he has captured throughout his thirty-year career, but which until now have almost never been put to use.

The artist states, “Basically, I’ve always ‘taken’ photos. I find photographic subjects wherever I go. There are hundreds. They are captured instantly, usually with hand held camera and no tripod.”

Alain Paiement Images en limbes, 2015 Impression numérique sur papier archive Digital print on archival paper Éd. 5 111 x 179 cm (43 3/4” x 70 1/2”)

Alain Paiement
Images en limbes, 2015
Impression numérique sur papier archive
Digital print on archival paper
Éd. 5
111 x 179 cm (43 3/4” x 70 1/2”)

Alain Paiement is redefining the temporality of his “snapshots,” a term that usually suggests spontaneity and immediacy, in opposition to premeditated staging. Yet, by rigorous technical manipulation of the image, each work in this series combines several individual photographs. As a result we see multiple realities, ‘images of images’, obtained through overlay, juxtaposition, collage and other ways of stitching moments together.

This series embodies Paiement’s most recent research: it situates his increasing interest in the notion of time by bringing together different temporalities within his creative process (recent manipulations of old photographs, for example). These works reflect on the instantaneous nature of contemporary culture and the importance of the present in linking society to its past and to its immanent future.

Alain Paiement Watch, Second, 2015 Impression numérique sur papier archive Digital print on archival paper Éd. 5 75 x 75 cm (29 1/2” x 29 1/2”)

Alain Paiement
Watch, Second, 2015
Impression numérique sur papier archive
Digital print on archival paper
Éd. 5
75 x 75 cm (29 1/2” x 29 1/2”)

Alain Paiement

Alain Paiement has been a key figure in contemporary Canadian photography. He researches the possibilities of how photography unfolds through time and space and translates this into images. Through installation, photo series, and video, Paiement experiments with perspective, telescopic views and lenses, as well as scanning, to explore the constantly changing relationship between the subject, its gaze and its environment.

Paiement’s work has been presented in numerous exhibitions since the 1980s throughout Canada and the United States, but also in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. His work has frequently featured in exhibition catalogues, monographs and articles in various media and specialised journals. He has also realised many public art works, notably Tessellations sans fin (2012) at the CHUM Research Centre in Montreal. Paiement’s work is held in major public and private collections in Canada, the United States, Spain and Belgium.

Alain Paiement, Lampes-particules, 2015 Impression numérique sur papier archive Digital print on archival paper Éd. 5 100 x 100 cm (39” x 39”)

Alain Paiement,
Lampes-particules, 2015
Impression numérique sur papier archive
Digital print on archival paper
Éd. 5
100 x 100 cm (39” x 39”)

Alain Paiement Instantanés, peut-être (exposition solo) Instants, Maybe (solo exhibition) 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement
Instantanés, peut-être (exposition solo)
Instants, Maybe (solo exhibition)
2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement Instantanés, peut être (exposition solo) Instants, Maybe (solo exhibition) 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement
Instantanés, peut être (exposition solo)
Instants, Maybe (solo exhibition)
2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement Instantanés, peut être (exposition solo) Instants, Maybe (solo exhibition) 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement
Instantanés, peut être (exposition solo)
Instants, Maybe (solo exhibition)
2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam: Made in Britain

December 21st, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Opening: Saturday, January 17 from 3 to 5 PM, artist in attendance

Karen Tam’s work revolves around issues relating to the representation of Asia in America and Europe through art, literature, media and consumer goods. She questions this slightly distorted Orient: an Orient tailor-made to the taste of the Western market.

Karen Tam Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box  |  Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012 Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs Papier-mâché, gesso, markers 2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Karen Tam
Moonflask Hauled Around in a Cardboard Box | Capt. Edward Watkins Whittington-Ince Moonflask 2012
Papier mâché, gesso, marqueurs
Papier-mâché, gesso, markers
2 comp. / 29 x 15 x 6.5 cm (11.5” x 6” x 2.5”)

Through appropriation and subversive strategies, Tam meticulously reproduces antiques, ornaments, traditional Chinese cutouts, typical interiors of Chinese restaurants and even opium dens. Yet, the artist maintains a subtle distinction between the original source of inspiration and her own interpretation from which emerges a clear critique that activates cultural and identity issues relating to racism and the globalization of trade.

Karen Tam Sinography (Gold) Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm  Total : 243 x 168 cm

Karen Tam
Sinography (Gold)
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
176 comp. / 15 x 15 cm
Total : 243 x 168 cm

Ironically, Tam’s sculptures and installations appropriate and magnify the aesthetics of this China fantasized by and for the West, through cutouts whose traditional iconography has been subverted, antique porcelain made from papier-mâché, and decorative lanterns out of cardboard.

Karen Tam From Frog's Robe to Crow's Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers 2009 Tissu découpé (brillant) Fabric cut-out (glitter) 143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

Karen Tam
From Frog’s Robe to Crow’s Feet and Dried Old Bones to Vinegar Drinkers
2009
Tissu découpé (brillant)
Fabric cut-out (glitter)
143 x 394 cm (56” x 155”)

The cultural overlap that these contemporary chinoiseries reflect triggers again the history of trade routes between ‘East’ and ‘West’; it recalls the Canadian government’s exclusionary policies towards the Chinese; it deals with the imaging of cultures through contact and stereotypes; just as it updates the question of authenticity in contemporary art using a cultural studies framework.

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Karen Tam, Made in Britain (solo), 2015, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

The exhibition Karen Tam. Made in Britain marks the return of the artist to Montreal, where her last solo show took place in 2005. The works presented for this occasion were made during the time she lived in London while completing her doctoral studies at Goldsmiths.

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011 Fausses perles, fil à pêche Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire 161 x 161 cm (63 1/2

Karen Tam Turandot’s Trophies 2011
Fausses perles, fil à pêche
Imitation pearl beads, fishing wire
161 x 161 cm (63 1/2″ x 63 1/2″)

Karen Tam lives and works in Montreal, Britain and the United States. She holds a MFA from The School of the Art Institute of Chicago and a PhD from the Centre for Cultural Studies at Goldsmiths, University of London. Since the 2000s, her work has been featured in exhibitions in Canada, Ireland, UK, Austria, United States, and China. She has been the recipient of multiple fellowships and grants and was on the longlist for the prestigious 2010 Sobey Art Award.

Karen Tam Rex vs. Quong, 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 57 x 81 cm (22 1/2

Karen Tam
Rex vs. Quong, 2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
57 x 81 cm (22 1/2″ x 32″)

www.karentam.ca

Alain Paiement: Irreversibles

November 7th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d'installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d’installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

For almost thirty years, Alain Paiement has been a key figure in contemporary Canadian photography. He researches the possibilities of how photography unfolds through time and space and translates this into images. Throughout his career, he has represented the movement of the world, at a micro level, mapping architectures with aerial views, and at a macro level, in representationsof solar and lunar cycles.

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d'installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d’installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

He now turns his attention to the depths of the ocean to capture videos of the hypnotic ballet of the moon jellyfish, and pieces of ice adrift on the Saint-Lawrence River. Here, Alain Paiement reaffirms the rigorous processes that characterize his approach as he plays with the images’ construction and the viewer’s perception. He reanimates series of still photographs or multiple perspectives of the same subject, juxtaposing these representations, but also altering their symmetry, synchrony, movement, and symbolism.

The manipulated images emerge from black backgrounds. It is difficult to determine whether they are photographs or moving images. They are blurring our perception of time, which seems distended and unstructured.

This important solo exhibition by Alain Paiement will be presented in two parts. The second instalment will take place in 2015.

The artist would like to thank Guilhem Molinier and the Fond de recherche du Québec – Société et culture.

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d'installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement, Irréversibles (vue d’installation _ installation view), 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Alain Paiement’s work has been presented in numerous exhibitions since the 1980s throughout Canada and the United States, but also in Europe, Latin America, and Asia. He has received several prizes in contemporary photography, and has produced many public artworks in Québec, namely for the new CHUM in Montréal (2013). His work is included in major institutional and private collections in Canada, the US, Spain, and Belgium.

Alain Paiement Start, End, Here 2012 Épreuve numérique à pigments qualité archive Archival digital pigment print

Alain Paiement
Start, End, Here
2012
Épreuve numérique à pigments qualité archive
Archival digital pigment print

Jean-Benoit Pouliot: Counterpoints

September 29th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Jean-Benoît Pouliot Sans titre 2013-2014 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 170 x 132 cm (67

Jean-Benoît Pouliot
Sans titre
2013-2014
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
170 x 132 cm (67″ x 52″)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to present its second solo exhibition of work by the artist Jean-Benoit Pouliot. The assembled works each activate, in their own singular way, the notion of ‘counterpoint’, as borrowed from the world of music, referencing a compositional technique based on the layering of several independent melodies.

Jean-Benoît Pouliot Sans titre 2013-2014 Acrylique sur toile Acrylic on canvas 170 x 132 cm (67

Jean-Benoît Pouliot
Sans titre
2013-2014
Acrylique sur toile
Acrylic on canvas
170 x 132 cm (67″ x 52″)

Contrepoints

The artist invites the viewer to consider the uniqueness of each painting as the basis of a perceptual experience that unfolds separately from the idea of a finished body of work, set in time. In this way, the exhibition’s common denominator is not a particular theme developed as a series, but rather, is considered in the broadest sense of the artist’s methodology, which over the past fifteen years has explored concepts of rhythm, transparency and accidents, through painting, performance, printmaking or photography. Contrepoints also seeks to demonstrate the influence and the importance of time in the work of Jean-Benoit Pouliot. In the studio, the artist works on several paintings simultaneously, thereby establishing a dialogue between pieces that are barely begun and others that are near completion. In this way, the interruptions he provokes become a determining compositional factor in the constructive process of the works, since the artist suspends the paintings in a provisional state that opens their potential, not only for action in the present, but also for external pictorial influences. This notion of a continuum, or temporal flow, linking each of these finished and in-progress works in all their singularity, allows the exhibition space to transform itself into an open, neutral ground, where formal comparisons can be liberally made and unmade between the works.

Jean-Benoit Pouliot  Sans titre 2014 acrylique sur toile acrylic on canvas 20.5 x 15 cm (8” x 6”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot
Sans titre
2014
acrylique sur toile
acrylic on canvas
20.5 x 15 cm (8” x 6”)

Jean-Benoit Pouliot

Jean-Benoit Pouliot (b. 1975) is a self-taught artist who began his career in the early 2000s through the medium of printmaking. Painting gained a central place in his practice in 2008, and since then, Pouliot has participated in several solo and group exhibitions in Québec and in New York. He has also participated in the public art happening Aires libres in Montréal (2014), the Extreme Painting event in Montréal (2013 and 2010), as well as the Multi Month 10 in Québec City (2009). His works are in numerous private and institutional collections, such as the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Bibliothèque et Archives nationales du Québec, Loto-Québec, National Bank, Bank of Montreal, TD Bank, Mouvement Desjardins, and the collection of the Cirque du Soleil, among others. Jean-Benoit Pouliot is represented by Galerie Hugues Charbonneau in Montréal. The artist lives and works in Montréal.

Pouliot2014-2

Pouliot2014-1

Pouliot2014-3

David Lafrance: Summer 2014

July 17th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

David Lafrance Rebutoir 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on Canvas 122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance
Rebutoir
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

The exhibition

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau presents a solo exhibition of works by Montreal artist David Lafrance. Observational drawings from the Montérégie region are shown alongside paintings created subsequently in his studio. These cognitive representations of the countryside stem from deep introspection, and evoke the memory of place and the current dynamics that inhabit it.

The large canvases on display often suggest landscapes, and benefit from the artist’s vast visual repertoire, simultaneously encompassing folk art imagery, pastoral scenes created through the subtle layering of glazes, maps sketched in freehand, and expressive impasto techniques.

Among the depicted scenes, symbols from popular culture become cultural clues in themselves. Folk art objects or modern relics inscribed within these turbulent landscapes offer a glimpse into our industrialized society’s relationship with nature. Indeed, the troubling yet seductive environments created by the artist through the amalgamation of anachronistic objects become cathartic tools to express life’s paradoxical impulses. These dichotomies, where symbolically charged objects cohabit in natural, yet unidentifiable spaces, trigger a narrative discourse that foregrounds the complex relationship modern humans have with their environment. Nature and civilisation meet in Lafrance’s creative work, allowing us to revisit our preconceived notions of reality.

David Lafrance St-Philippe 2014 Fusain sur papier Charcoal on paper 38 x 53 cm (15” x 21”)

David Lafrance
St-Philippe
2014
Fusain sur papier
Charcoal on paper
38 x 53 cm (15” x 21”)

Artist’s statement

Painter, sculptor and sound installation artist, Lafrance creates unique works where an exalted natural world unfolds and merges with elements of human life. Through the creation of Edenic landscapes, Lafrance explores his own psyche and awakens his sensitive spirit to test the limits of expressionism. Within the artist’s practice, where basic subjectivity is laid bare, expressiveness is used to explore human cognitive reflexes and reveal specific points of view. By doing so, the artist uses art’s expressivity to confer critical value upon it. Indeed, Lafrance’s enigmatic work generally revolves around dissenting themes such as escapist pursuits, industrialization, nature, or individual and collective identity.

David Lafrance Un atelier à la campagne 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 183 x 274 cm (72” x 108”)

David Lafrance
Un atelier à la campagne
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
183 x 274 cm (72” x 108”)

David Lafrance 20 000 ans 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance
20 000 ans
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
122 x 152 cm (48” x 60”)

David Lafrance La vie après 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 102 x 114 cm (40” x 45”)

David Lafrance
La vie après
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
102 x 114 cm (40” x 45”)

David Lafrance Usine 05 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 38 x 58 cm (15” x 23”)

David Lafrance
Usine 05
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
38 x 58 cm (15” x 23”)

David Lafrance Usine 08 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 31 x 41 cm (12” x 16”)

David Lafrance
Usine 08
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
31 x 41 cm (12” x 16”)

David-Lafrance-Ete2014-0

Lafrance-Ete2014-1

David-Lafrance-Ete2014-2

ECHO 2: Against the Grain of History

May 24th, 2014 § 0 comments § permalink

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Trevor Gould, installation, Écho 2, 2014, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Maria Hupfield, installation, 2014, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Karen Tam, Chinese Fever, 2014, installation, Écho 2, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Benoit Aquin Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti) 2011 Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive Archival pigment print Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″ Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Benoit Aquin
Carnaval VIII, Jacmel (Haïti)
2011
Impression numérique à pigments qualité archive
Archival pigment print
Éd. 7, 32″ x 48″
Éd. 5, 40″ x 60″

Trevor Gould The Man who Walked Over the Moon 2008 Aquarelle Watercolour 41 x 31 cm (16

Trevor Gould
The Man who Walked Over the Moon
2008
Aquarelle
Watercolour
41 x 31 cm (16″ x 12,25″)

Trevor Gould Heritage, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould
Heritage, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
51 x 36 cm (20” x 14 ¼”)

Trevor Gould Echo 1, 2014 Aquarelle Watercolour 23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Trevor Gould
Echo 1, 2014
Aquarelle
Watercolour
23 x 30 cm (9” x 12”)

Maria Hupfield Step (Plural Positions series #14) 2014 Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Step (Plural Positions series #14)
2014
Épreuve numérique de niveau archive, feutre et médium acrylique
Archival inkjet print, felt and acrylic medium
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Seven (Plural Positions series #13) 2014 Feutre et fil de coton Felt and cotton tread 28 x 22 cm (11

Maria Hupfield
Seven (Plural Positions series #13)
2014
Feutre et fil de coton
Felt and cotton tread
28 x 22 cm (11″ x 8,5″)
Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield Universal Parallels 2014 Feutre, fil à coudre Felt, sowing tread 30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”) Éd. unique

Maria Hupfield
Universal Parallels
2014
Feutre, fil à coudre
Felt, sowing tread
30 x 31 x 39 cm (12” x 12 ¼” x 15 ½”)
Éd. unique

David Lafrance Video poker 2014 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 203 x 183 cm (80

David Lafrance
Video poker
2014
Huile sur toile
Oil on canvas
203 x 183 cm (80″ x 72″)
(Photo : Éliane Excoffier)

David Lafrance Nuit d'élections 2014 Acrylique sur papier Acrylic on paper 76 x 56 cm (30

David Lafrance
Nuit d’élections
2014
Acrylique sur papier
Acrylic on paper
76 x 56 cm (30″ x 22″)

Karen Tam I May Flirt a Little, but I'm no Yellow Peril 2009 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 90 x 40,5 cm (35,5

Karen Tam
I May Flirt a Little, but I’m no Yellow Peril
2009
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
90 x 40,5 cm (35,5″ x 16″)
Éd. 5

Karen Tam The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible 2006 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 13 x 68 cm (5.12

Karen Tam
The New Old Comet—A Phenomenon Now Visible
2006
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
13 x 68 cm (5.12″ x 26.77″)
Éd. 4

Karen Tam  Do you mind if I smoke? 2008 Tissu en vinyl doré Gold vinyl fabric 30 x 30 cm (11.81

Karen Tam
Do you mind if I smoke?
2008
Tissu en vinyl doré
Gold vinyl fabric
30 x 30 cm (11.81″ x 11.81″)
Éd.: 5

Karen Tam  Peeping Tom 2008 Papier doré découpé Gold paper-cutout 43 x 61 cm (24

Karen Tam
Peeping Tom
2008
Papier doré découpé
Gold paper-cutout
43 x 61 cm (24″ x 16.93″)
Éd. : 5

The artist Karen Tam would like to acknowledge the support of the Canada Council for the Arts.

CCFA_RGB_colour_f

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