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Trevor Gould, Moridja Kitenge Banza and Cindy Phenix in residency

June 18th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Trevor Gould, Live in a Box: A Refuge, 2017
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
75,5 x 68,5 x 50,5 cm (29 3/4” x 27” x 20”)

Moridja Kitenge Banza, Chiromancie #9 No 11, 2019
Encre sur mylar
Ink on mylar
107 x 244 cm (42” x 96”)

Cindy Phenix, The End That Is Not, 2019
Pastel, huile, acrylique et tissus sur lin
Oil, acrylic pastel and found fabric on linen
121,9 x 91,4 cm (48” x 36”)

Guillaume Adjutor Provost: Chambre réverbérante

April 14th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

Opening April 17 from 5 to 7pm

Guillaume Adjutor Provost, Sans titre (flux 03.05), 2019
Encre sur papier
Ink on paper
29,7 x 21 cm (11,7” x 8,3”)

For his second exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Chambre réverbérante, Guillaume Adjutor Provost is presenting a selection of drawings from his most recent series entitled Flux. These drawings result from a number of automatic-drawing sessions whereby each pen drawing on paper was executed over the course of several consecutive hours. During these late-night drawing shifts, Provost found himself in a state of altered consciousness provoked by self-induced hypnosis a hypnagogic state that allowed for a free-form exploration of his frame of mind on a given day. He likens the visual vocabulary resulting from this process to a flow of data streaming directly from his psyche.  

Pulling from shapes and hidden symbols that emerged during these sessions, Provost created two sculptures that echo the Fluxdrawings. Fée du Kapital (Shift de jour)and Fée du Kapital (Shift de nuit)represent two pairs of casted feet dressed and bejewelled in boots and fabrics. The presence of these dismembered feet in space create a tension, seeming to conjure up spirits. To the artist, these anchors are stand-ins for a system in deconstruction, they could be considered the foundation to the building of a new order.

Chambre réverbérante results from Guillaume Adjutor Provost’s current desire to create a body of work that bypasses referentiality in order to access the raw internal processes of the psyche and by the same token, expose our relationship to the unregulated labour inherent to artistic work, both material and immaterial.

Guillaume Adjutor Provost lives and works in Montreal where he completed a doctorate in art and research at UQAM in 2017. He has received grants from the Conseil des Arts et des Lettres du Québec, the Canada Council for the Arts, the OJIQ and SODEC. His work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions throughoutCanada, France, Germany, Belgium, Catalonia, Lithuania, and Switzerland. In parallel, his practice has been highlighted through the Jean-Claude Rochefort award and the Claudine and Stephen Bronfman Fellowship in Contemporary Art. Since autumn 2016, he has been provided with a studio at the Fonderie Darling where he is currently showing a solo exhibition in conversation with Julie Tremble and Guillaume B.B. entitled “Vapeurs”, curated by Ji-Yoon Han. In 2018, he presented a solo exhibition at Bikini in Lyon, and participated in group shows at Critical Distance (Toronto) and TAP Art Space (Montreal), and conducted a research residency at Rupert Foundation in Vilnius, Lithuania.

 

Guillaume Adjutor Provost, Chambre réverbérante, 2019
Exposition / Exhibition
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada
(photo : Jean-Michael Seminaro)

 

 

Moridja Kitenge Banza:1

February 27th, 2019 § 0 comments § permalink

 

Moridja Kitenge Banza, Christ Pantocrator No1, 2017
Acrylique sur bois, feuille d’or
Acrylic on panel, gold leaf
40 x 30 cm (15,75” x 11,75”)

 

For his first exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Moridja Kitenge Banza is presenting  a painting from his series “Christ Pantocrator” which explores the complexity of his Congolese cultural identity through deeply rooted colonial symbols that he subjects to shifts in meaning. The artist describes this series in the following text.

 

A Christ Pantocrator is a Byzantine icon of Christ represented as almighty in his glorious body. This painting series borrows this representation as a starting point to question my relationship to masks from Africa found in Western art museums.

In most African cultures, masks are meant to be used in sacred rites and ceremonies celebrating birth, death or harvest. When dispalced as static objects in museums, they become amputated from their contexts of origin, simultaneously revealing aporias : the aritsts’ identities are unknown and their provenance, undisclosed to the people and places they come from. Silent and detached from contemporary African life, these masks are nonetheless a material testament of the diversity and complexity of these societies. They are essential vehicules of customs and heritage for future generations of africans.

My reflexions are guided by a critical analysis of historical and cultural aspects of my country, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as my own history, combining multiple layers of narratives and meanings. Catholicism plays an important role, passed on to my ancesters by Jesuit priests during the evangelization of the Congo, and carried through my ancestry, as well as my own family’s experiences. My current outlook on these persistant symbols is energized by an intersecting creative intent, between memory and reappropriation.

To this end, I draw from various museum collections that possess African masks. I reproduce Pantocrator paintings, over which I paint the masks I have chosen, covering the face of Christ. Through this intervention, I return its glory to the sacred object and reactivate its function: that of being worn.

 

Moridja Kitenge Banza : 1 (exposition_exhibition), 2019, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada (photo : Jean-Michael Seminaro)

 

 

Biography

Canadian Congolese aritst Moridja Kitenge Banza was born in Kinshasa in 1980 in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He holds degrees from l’Académie des beaux-arts de Kinshasa, from l’École supérieure des beaux-arts de Nantes Métropole and from the Humanities and Social Sciences faculty of l’Université de La Rochelle.  In 2010, he was awarded the first prize of the Biennale of Contemporary African Art, DAK’ART for his video Hymne à nousand his installation work De 1848 à nos jours. His work was part of exhibitions at the Musée Dauphinois (Grenoble, France), at the Museum of Contemporary Art (Rosklide, Danemark), at the Arndt Gallery and Ngbk (Berlin, Allemagne), at the Biennale Internationale de Casablanca (Casablanca, Maroc), at the Fondation Attijariwafa bank (Casablanca, Maroc), at the Fondation Blachère (Apt, France) as well as at the BAnQ, at galerie Joyce Yahouda, at Oboro and at the Musée des beaux-arts de Montréal (Montréal, Canada).

 

Artist Statement

As a multidisciplinary artist, I express myself through painting, photography, video, drawing and installation.

My process is situated at the intersection of reality and fiction. Through this lens, I question the history, memory and identity of the places where I live or have lived in relation to the place I occupy in these localities. I intentionally confuse fact and fiction to problematize hegemonic narratives and create spaces where marginalized discourse could flourish. Drawing from past and present situations, I organize, assemble and trace figures, as would a land surveyor, by reappropriating the codes of cultural, political, social and economic representations. In so doing, I build my own tools to better invest the “other’s” territory in order to enrich all the fields of research that inspire my practice.

 

The gallery would like to extend its gratitude to Anne-Isabelle Pronkina for her contribution to the development of the exhibition’s concept.

 

Moridja Kitenge Banza, Authentique #1, 2017
Impression archive au jet d’encre sur papier
Archival digital inkjet print on paper
Édition 3/5
86,3 x 61 cm (34” x 24”)

Exhibition at the gallery

April 1st, 2017 § 0 comments § permalink

Jean-Benoit Pouliot L'image soupe : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons, 2017 Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Jean-Benoit Pouliot – L’image souple : Inclinaisons et déclinaisons

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau

From March15 to April 22

National and international news

Alain Paiement YULFLY, 2016 Impression numérique sur papier coton archive  Digital print on archival cotton rag paper Éd. 5 Image : 142 x 182cm (56” x 71 3/4”) Papier_Paper : 152,5 x 190,5 cm (60” x 75”)

Foire PAPIER 2017

Benoit Aquin, Isabelle Hayeur, David Lafrance, Alain Paiement, Jean-Benoit Pouliot, Karen Tam

À l’Arsenal Montréal

Du 21 avril au 23 avril (soirée VIP le 20 avril)

6maria-Photo- Toni Hafkenscheid

Maria Hupfield — The One Who Keeps on Giving

The Power Plant, Toronto, Canada

(Curator: Carolin Köchling)

From January 28 to May 14

Hayeur_Monument_Hommes_carrières_03

Isabelle Hayeur — When Form Becomes Attitude

Contemporary Calgary

(Group exhibition curated by Noa Bronstein)

March 16 – July 30, 2017

Solastalgia

Isabelle Hayeur — Solastagia

Hiroshima MOCA, Hiroshima, Japon

April 1 to May 28

Jonathan Plante Image ambulatoire, 2016 Sérigraphie lenticulaire Screenprint on lenticular lens 56 x 59 cm (22” x 23”)

Jonathan Plante – Recent works

Centre d’exposition Ubisoft

A collaboration of Ubisoft, Art Souterrain and Galerie Hugues Charbonneau

Vernissage RSVP Wednesday April 12, 5:30pm

Visits by appointment until May 11

5480, rue Saint-Dominique, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard Les fleurs animales, 2017 Huile sur toile Oil on canvas 95 x 70 cm (37,4” x 27,6”)

Cynthia Girard — Les fleurs animées

L’écart, Rouyn-Noranda, Canada

(exposition de groupe, commissaire Cynthia Girard)

Du 21 avril au 28 mai

Julie Trudel: Bone Black and Titanium White — Transparency and distortion

April 6th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

Galerie Hugues Charbonneau is pleased to present Julie Trudel’s second solo exhibition, featuring the latest development in her work with the materiality of colour. This series of approximately 10 three-dimensional paintings was created in 2015 during various artist residencies, and was presented in part at the Anna Leonowens Gallery at NSCAD University last fall.

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion NNBN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

With Bone Black and Titanium White—Transparency and Distortion, Julie Trudel continues to work with the self-imposed chromatic constraint she adopted in 2012, namely the use of pure black and white pigments which she simply dilutes in large amounts of clear acrylic medium. This time, however, she has innovated her approach by adding clear acrylic supports (also known as Plexiglas). Technical considerations at the end of 2014 led her to choose this material as a way to explore its material properties – transparency, reflection, reversibility and plasticity – in conjunction with her fascination for the translucence and opacity of paint. While experimenting with various types of plastics, light emerged as a central component and the paintings were subsequently pulled out from the wall to better enable the interplay of light and surface.

Julie Trudel Transparence et distorsion BNNN, 2015 Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet 117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46

Julie Trudel
Transparence et distorsion BNNN, 2015
Acrylique et gesso sur feuille acrylique
Acrylic and gesso on acrylic sheet
117 x 59,5 x 35,5 cm (46″ x 23 1/2″ x 14″)
(Photo : Jordan Blackburn)

Each piece is created on a very thin sheet of Plexiglas painted on one side before being bent into three sections through thermoforming. Two sections are painted in flat black tints, giving them a mirror-like quality, or in white, which reflects light. The third section is clear and covered in a pattern of translucent dots that seem to break away from the surface, producing the illusion of movement and depth. The folding of the two panels on either side of the central one produces a complex interplay of reflections between the three sections, while the concave shape it creates captures light and multiplies the effect of transparency or distortion within the cluster of dots. Trudel’s choice of Plexiglas has evidently deepened her research into the materiality of colour and light, thereby opening new possibilities within the pictorial field. Moreover, their presentation in the gallery allows viewers to experience the near-sculptural nature of her paintings as they extend into the exhibition space, and to witness how dramatically their appearance shifts depending on the angle of view.

Julie Trudel Noir d'ivoire et blanc de titane -- transparence et distorsion, 2016 Vue d'exposition Exhibition view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel
Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane — transparence et distorsion, 2016
Vue d’exposition
Exhibition view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel

Over the past five years, her work has been presented in France, in Germany, Japan, United-States, and throughout Canada. Trudel was a two-time finalist in the RBC Canadian Painting Competition (2011, 2012), and winner of the Joseph Plaskett Award in painting (2013). Her work is included in several collections, including the Collection Prêt d’œuvres d’art of the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec; the Ville de Montréal; RBC Bank and TD Bank. She lives and works in Montréal.

The artist would like to warmly thank the Joseph Plaskett Foundation, the Triangle Arts Association, NSCAD University and the Robert Pope Foundation, who supported the development of this new project. She would also like to acknowledge the contribution of her skilful and reliable studio assistants, Katie Lesser and Arkadi Lavoie Lachapelle, as well as Donald Thompson, Martin Schop and Atelier Clark, who helped resolve many technical challenges.

Julie Trudel Noir d'ivoire et blanc de titane -- transparence et distorsion, 2016 Vue d'exposition Exhibition view Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Julie Trudel
Noir d’ivoire et blanc de titane — transparence et distorsion, 2016
Vue d’exposition
Exhibition view
Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal, Canada

Cynthia Girard-Renard: La revanche des Sans-culottes

February 18th, 2016 § 0 comments § permalink

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

La revanche des Sans-culottes

For her first solo exhibition at Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Cynthia Girard-Renard proposes a body of work created during the CALQ residency in Paris in 2015 and presented last fall in Porto, Portugal, under the title Les Sans-culottes. For the present exhibition, the series has been enlarged to include several new works, and already-existing puppets, banners and paintings have been complexified and reused. Girard-Renard’s starting point is the French Revolution, from which she develops a critical reflection on revolutionary thought in our current context of neoliberal austerity.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015 Acrylique sur toile libre de coton Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas 224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Sous les pavés, la plage, 2015
Acrylique sur toile libre de coton
Acrylic on unstretched cotton canvas
224 x 287 cm (88’’ 1/4 x 113’’)

La revanche des Sans-culottes borrows its irreverent and comical energy from the caricatural social satire genre in 18th century France, an important influence for Girard-Renard during the development of the project. The title of the exhibition refers to the derogatory moniker applied to working-class protesters, that wore trousers or striped skirts, rather than the “culotte”, knickers favored by the Ancien Régime aristocracy. Girard-Renard stages confrontations between the monarchy and the people through an array of works depicting the decadence of Marie-Antoinette and Louis XVI’s court, which she compares to the voracity of today’s oligarchs and millionaires. The luxury industry, fashion, and finance collide with the threat of debt in Greece and the ubiquitous austerity that clobbers us in Québec, Europe and elsewhere – not unlike Punch’s beating-stick.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016 Techniques mixtes Mixed media 240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Petit théâtre du grand capital, 2016
Techniques mixtes
Mixed media
240 x 90 x 90 cm (94 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 35 1/2’’)

In the gallery space, Le petit théâtre du grand capital (2016) depicts this confrontation between the 99% and the elusive and shapeshifting 1%. Puppets and papier mâché props adopt the burlesque and ribald codes of the Théâtre du Grand-Guignol, active in Paris from 1896 to 1963. For its part, the theatrical curtain of Sous les pavés, la plage (2015), a reference to the famous May 1968 slogan, acts as a bridge between the exhibition and 1789, invoking past revolutionary ardor and defiantly taking a stand against mediocrity’s dominion.

Cynthia Girard-Renard Les Sans-culottes, 2015 Papier, bois et corde Paper, wood and rope 167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard
Les Sans-culottes, 2015
Papier, bois et corde
Paper, wood and rope
167,5 x 90 x 244 cm (66’’ x 35 1/2’’ x 96’’)

Cynthia Girard-Renard

For more than 20 years, Girard-Renard has been actively exhibiting in Canada and internationally, including: Esker Foundation, Calgary (2014); Thousand Plateaus Art Space, Chengdu, China (2011); Dunlop Art Gallery, Regina (2010); Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, Québec (2010); September Gallery, Berlin (2009); Künstlerhaus Bethanien, Berlin (2009); SPACE, London (2006), not to mention her solo exhibition, Fictions sylvestres, at the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal (2005) and her participation in the 2008 Quebec Triennial. Girard-Renard’s work is found in the collections of the Musée d’art contemporain de Montréal, the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, the Musée national des beaux-arts du Québec, the Carleton University Art Gallery, the UQAM Gallery, as well as many private collections. The artist lives and works in Montréal.

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

Cynthia Girard-Renard, La revanche des Sans-culottes, 2016, exposition _ exhibition, Galerie Hugues Charbonneau, Montréal

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